“With the help of Google Keyword Planner, or other keyword research tools, you can find topically-relevant keywords and phrases based on broader seed keywords, and evaluate the competitiveness of each along the way. For a newer channel, it would be reasonable to start with easier, less-competitive keywords or more specific long-tails, and once you succeed – to try ranking a video for more competitive terms.
All the estimates by research firms and analysts, says Kirjner, are "based more on belief and anecdotes than on truly representative data. What's more -- beyond anecdotes either shared by Google or collected through discussions with ad buyers, creators and multichannel network operators -- we know very little about what is available on YouTube, what people watch and how much it gets watched."
Professional quality music and sound effects can often be the difference between a successful video and one that comes off as an amateur production. Fortunately, cinema quality sounds are now readily available, even if your videos don’t have Hollywood-size budgets. When selecting music for your video, it’s important to first consider the overall mood you’d like to create. Music is one of the most valuable tools for setting the tone of a video and often informs the editing style, camera movement, and on-camera action. If you’re introducing your brand to a new audience, you probably want to select music that is upbeat and energetic. The second key part to picking music is to make sure you have the necessary permissions to use the song. What you’re looking for here are songs marked as “royalty free.” This doesn’t mean the music will be free, but it does mean you only pay a flat rate to use the music and won’t have to pay additional royalties or licensing fees on top of that.

YouTube is one of the most popular websites on the planet, receiving billions of views a year and paying out millions to the content creators that it hosts. Money earned through YouTube is generated by advertisements. Content creators who host ads on their videos receive about half of the ad revenue those ads generate, while YouTube takes the rest. Anyone can monetize their videos, as long as their videos do not break copyright law.
YouTube uses a cost per view (CPV) model, which means you only pay when someone engages with your video ad. If your ad is skipped, you aren’t charged for that view. The exact cost per click varies varies on keyword competitiveness but on average it’s around $0.06. Once you set your daily campaign budget, YouTube will display your ad until the daily budget is spent.
I do not think this is how most people use YouTube. YouTube videos are more like blog posts, and fit more effectively into the niche of content marketing. Sure, people will comment—but they do so in a manner similar to how they comment on blog posts. They come to view and digest videos, not necessarily share their thoughts about the day. Because of this, you should approach YouTube as content marketing instead of social media marketing.
“Even if advertisers are paying a decent amount to promote their products through video ads, only a portion of their expenditures ever make it into content creators’ pockets,” says entrepreneur Michael Johnston. “For example, if advertisers are paying an average of $20 per 1,000 ad impressions, the videos where those ads are being shown may only generate $2 or $3 per 1,000 views.”
The Social Media Marketing Talk Show is a weekly 1-hour live video show that features expert commentary on the week’s top news in social media and what it means for marketers. Broadcast on Crowdcast, the show is simulcast each Friday to Facebook Live, Periscope, and YouTube. You can also listen and subscribe to the podcast version on iTunes/Apple Podcast, Android, Google Play, Stitcher, or via RSS.
As I mentioned, YouTube is one of the biggest websites around – to be more specific, it’s currently the second most popular website in the world. And even though most people don’t think of YouTube primarily as a search engine, that’s exactly what most visitors do on the site. YouTube’s not just the second most popular website; it’s also the second most popular search engine – topped only by Google. This means that the platform presents a huge potential for reach for your business.
Highly regarded on the world speaker circuit, Lilach Bullock has graced Forbes and Number 10 Downing Street. She’s a hugely connected and highly influential entrepreneur. She is listed in Forbes as one of the top 20 women social media power influencers, named one of 10 top digital marketers by Brand24 and was crowned the Social Influencer of Europe by Oracle. She is listed as the number one Influencer in the UK by Career Experts and is a recipient for a Global Women Champions Award for her outstanding contribution and leadership in business.
It’s important to visit each location you plan on using before the shoot. On your scouting trips, make sure you’ll be able to capture the kinds of shots you want for your video. Typically, it’s better to have more space so you can adjust the camera position as needed. You should also check for any loud or ambient noise like busy roads or air conditioning units that could interfere with your audio when filming, and you should consider light and time of day. While the room might have sufficient light in the morning, you may need to bring a lighting kit in to film during the afternoon or evening.

13. Build traffic to your site. “Add links to your Social Media profiles and websites into your description area of your video. This will help people find you no matter how many views your video gets. Let them know how they can see similar videos of interest from you.” – Chris N. West, These 17 Marketing Tips Will Get You the Best Results from YouTube, ChrisNWest.com; Twitter: @ChrisNWest
As it does, you can enter in the video’s basic information, including its name, the video description, the privacy settings, and which playlist you’d like it to appear on. You should also add tags, which helps the video show up in relevant searches. You’ll want to make sure that the video’s text is optimized for SEO; we’ll go over this in the next section.
Surf around YouTube and click through the most-viewed video clips to get an idea of the types of videos that garner the most hits. Everything from original music to product reviews, pranks, and even video blogs create interest on YouTube. The goal is to create an audience, so use your webcam or digital video camera to garner interest. Remember that YouTube does not allow pornographic images, nor can you make money from cover songs to which you do not own the rights.
Alternatively, you can also become an affiliate for brands and make residual passive income through commissions from every sale you generate through your channel. This works especially well if you review products as part of your YouTube channel. Since there's no risk involved on the brand's end (they only pay when they make sales), there's usually a low bar to getting started.

Estimates for YouTube's annual revenue, nearly all of which still comes from ads, vary a fair amount. But many of the estimates are now above $10 billion. At different points, Bank of America and Mizuho forecast that YouTube would post 2017 revenue of $13 billion and $12 billion, respectively. And in February, Baird's Colin Sebastian estimated YouTube is doing around $15 billion in annual sales.
In any case, if you have incontrovertible evidence that YouTube is actually unprofitable today, and why that is (i.e. is it because they’re just investing all that profit back into growth, or are their upkeep costs truly just on the order of multiple billions of dollars?), would love to see it and adjust this accordingly. Doesn’t really change any of the points made though.

Like any good campaign or content generation, it’s important to establish what you want to accomplish with your video before you get into the nuts and bolts of bringing it to life. Do you want to increase awareness for your brand? Drive inbound website traffic? Add subscribers to your channel? Increase social shares? Or do something else entirely? Establishing a singular goal at the start of the production process is key and will allow you to focus the video’s script and strategy on accomplishing it. It’s perfectly OK to have multiple goals for your YouTube channel, like increasing brand awareness and adding subscribers, but the best practice is to focus on one goal per video. 

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