Case studies: Another way you can promote your business and your products or services is to create video case studies of your clients. These case studies don’t need to deal exclusively with your product: they can focus on client origin stories, recent achievements, or plans for the future. Hootsuite publishes videos of their work with different brands:
How-to videos: How-to videos tend to perform very well because they provide a lot of value to the viewer. For example, if you were selling social media software, you could create how-to videos showing your viewers how to get started with Twitter marketing or how to grow your Facebook following. You can look to top performing blog posts for material for these videos, or you can develop a plan for a recurring series. JetBlue has a series of “Flight Etiquette” videos that emphasize how not to travel:
This means that if someone skips an ad, or is running an ad blocker, then you don’t get paid for that view. This makes estimating the amount of views a video has and how much a user makes off of the video very challenging. It also depends if it’s a video ad at the front of your video, or just a box at the bottom of your page; this determines how many people interact with your ad and the amount of money that can be made.
“Additionally, such branding is important for ensuring that your viewers remember the video, which is especially handy when they need to refer someone to it. Even though they might forget the actual content and the name of the video, remembering your branded footage will help direct viewers to your channel.” – Jon Clark, 7 Vital Elements of a Successful YouTube Video, SearchEngineJournal; Twitter: @sejournal
Scenario 2 You make a video teaching people about home loans that gets 10,000 views, of which your ad Click Through Rate (CTR) is 0.8%.  Meaning 80 people clicked the ad.  If the CPC is $17.63 the total advertising dollars the total advertising made would be $1,410.  Google keeps around 45% leaving your payout $776.  This gives you about $1 per 13 views.
On October 9, 2006, it was announced that the company would be purchased by Google for US$1.65 billion in stock, which was completed on November 13. At that time it was Google's second-largest acquisition.[17] The agreement between Google and YouTube came after YouTube presented three agreements with media companies in an attempt to avoid copyright-infringement lawsuits. YouTube planned to continue operating independently, with its co-founders and 68 employees working within Google.[18]
Let’s talk about YouTube. We’ve all heard of it, and chances are, we’ve all spent a wasted afternoon watching one silly cat video after another. YouTube is a great source for funny, entertaining content, but it’s also increasingly becoming an essential tool for marketers. In fact, nearly half of all marketers (48%) plan to add YouTube to their marketing strategy over the next 12 months according to the State of Inbound report.
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