I’m sure you have seen a viral YouTube video. They come in all shapes and sizes—from super popular songs like “Watch Me (Whip/Nae Nae)” to a funny grumpy cat, someone falling down, or even something completely off the wall like Ylvis' “What Does the Fox Say?" video. What do they all have in common? Well, these posters all made a ton of money on YouTube when their videos went viral.

Starting in May 2017, YouTube will no longer allow users to add annotations to their videos. Instead, they are encouraging users to incorporate cards and end screens in their videos to poll viewers, link to external sites, or direct people to other videos. Thankfully, cards and end screens are as easy to add as annotations. Cards are small, rectangular notifications that appear in the top, right-hand corner of both desktop and mobile screens. You can include up to five cards per video, but if you’re including multiple cards, be sure to space them out evenly to give viewers time to take the desired action.
When researching keywords, I recommend doing keyword research both for Google, and specifically for YouTube. This way, you’ll make sure that you’re ranking as best you can on both search engines, increasing views significantly. Any of the top keyword research tools will work for Google (I discuss them in-depth here), and I most recommend keywordtool.io’s YouTube-specific search. Prioritize the keywords you find in the YouTube search, as this will be your best bet for being found.
But sponsorships are where the big bucks are made, and where intermediaries like MediaKix and other agencies come in. This is the major leagues: Most brands aren’t interested in YouTube channels with fewer than 200,000 to 300,000 subscribers or average views of less than 10,000 to 20,000 per video, says Asano. The bar is also high because videos cost more to make, and require tricky negotiations —the sponsor will want to know where their product will be featured, for how long, and so forth. “When we’re connecting top brands with top influencers on YouTube, you’re talking a minimum budget of $50,000 to $100,000, and it just goes up from there,” Asano explains. “Some of the biggest YouTube influencers get paid $100,000 to 200,000 for a single video. And then those videos get millions of views. That’s why there’s a lot of money in the space.”

16. Create usable, valuable content. “First and foremost, a YouTube video should serve a purpose and give consumers a reason to visit your channel. Instead of trying to create the next viral video, focus on what type of information your clients are looking for and provide that information in an interesting and valuable way. The Home Depot’s You Tube page is a great example of crafting video content that their audience is looking for. The company’s channel is packed full of how to videos that cater to their consumer’s do it yourself attitude. Remember, your You Tube Channel is a great educational tool and one that can provide your target customer with valuable information and establish a lasting relationship with your organization.” – Payden Sewell, YouTube Marketing Tips, Full Media; Twitter: @fullmedia

Next let’s break down the types of advertisements on YouTube. You’re probably familiar with them if you watch any amount of YouTube videos. There’s the bottom text based ad that is displayed at the bottom of your video, and then there is the clip that plays at the beginning of your video. You can select which of these ads your video can have, and it might make a difference depending on your audience or how much revenue your video brings in.

It's 2018. We don't watch TV with commercials, we don't listen to the radio, and when was the last time you bought a newspaper? Advertising has moved to digital and I've been plugged into it since the beginning. I prefer to focus on e-commerce, crowdfunding, and lead generation. But if you have a project outside of that, I'm open to talking about it. I've managed Facebook advertising campaigns for companies that spend over $275,000 per month to companies that spend around $1,000 per month. I focus on ROI. That's what matters right? Five years of experience in Facebook advertising, SEO, Google AdWords, YouTube advertising, content creation copy, authority pages, blog posts, Instagram, Facebook, landing page design, CRM management, mobile advertising, retargeting, display advertising, and publisher relations. Google AdWords Search Advertising Certified Google Video Advertising Certified Google Analytics Certified HubSpot Inbound Marketing Certified Managed, devised creative, and executed Facebook advertising account for e-commerce operation with monthly budgets of up to $275,000+. Managed international display advertising budgets of over $40,000 per month ($296,000 per month across all clients) with a 15% cost of COS. Managed domestic Google AdWords budgets of over $15,000 per month ($49,000 per month across all clients) with an average of 24% COS. Turned around 5+ year existing Google AdWords campaign from $856 per lead to $130 per lead in six months. Built outdoor industry blog into a content site with over 40,000 unique visitors per month over 2 years. Increased inbound calls to local plumbing business by 223% per month using Google AdWords and call tracking over three months. Designed Facebook ad campaign to add 8,623 likes to an outdoor industry company over 30 days and at a cost of only $379. Increased traffic through SEO and SEO based content creation by an average of 26% over four months across an agency portfolio of 12 clients.
They could even offer faster encoders for people uploading videos to youtube so it didn’t take so long as a premium feature and I think a lot of streamers would pay a few bucks to have more control over their stream. I’ve never really put much thought into it but I’m sure they could do a whole bunch of things before they resort to the need to make youtube suck in order to keep the lights on.
The first step to becoming a YouTube marketing pro is creating and optimizing your video’s metadata. Simply put, metadata gives viewers information about your video, which includes your video title, description, tags, category, thumbnail, subtitles, and closed captions. Providing the right information in your video’s metadata will help to ensure that it is properly indexed by YouTube and appears when people are searching for videos like yours. Be succinct and straightforward when filling out your metadata -- your content could be removed if you try to promote it with unrelated keywords. Check out the video and tips below to learn more about optimizing your video for search.
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