Link economics -- For years, people in media and tech proclaimed the link economy. The idea was that you'd give away material, welcome people to link to it, and those links would bring new audiences that you could then turn into customers. But there is a basic problem, in that very few people actually click links that require them to go to other sites. As the Journal pointed out, many people simply watch a video hosted on YouTube and embedded elsewhere and don't actually visit Google's site, reducing the ability to display ads.
Once you determine how often you can post, you should also consider when you release your videos. According to Oberlo, most viewers watch YouTube videos in the evenings and on weekends. The best time to post your content is early afternoons during the week or early Saturday and Sunday mornings so that your videos will be indexed by the time your potential viewers are searching.
20. Focus on the quality of your content. “Don’t worry about the production quality of your videos—especially when you first start creating video content. The quality of your content is more important than the production quality of your videos. Your first priority should be making videos that are both helpful and entertaining for your target audience.
YouTube was founded by Chad Hurley, Steve Chen, and Jawed Karim, when they worked for PayPal.[3] Prior to working for PayPal, Hurley studied design at the Indiana University of Pennsylvania; Chen and Karim studied computer science together at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign.[4] YouTube's initial headquarters was above a pizzeria and Japanese restaurant in San Mateo, California.[5]
YouTube uses a cost per view (CPV) model, which means you only pay when someone engages with your video ad. If your ad is skipped, you aren’t charged for that view. The exact cost per click varies varies on keyword competitiveness but on average it’s around $0.06. Once you set your daily campaign budget, YouTube will display your ad until the daily budget is spent.
Let’s talk about YouTube. We’ve all heard of it, and chances are, we’ve all spent a wasted afternoon watching one silly cat video after another. YouTube is a great source for funny, entertaining content, but it’s also increasingly becoming an essential tool for marketers. In fact, nearly half of all marketers (48%) plan to add YouTube to their marketing strategy over the next 12 months according to the State of Inbound report.
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