With the basic profile complete, it’s time to add a few finishing touches! Before we move on, it’s important to get one thing straight -- you can customize the way your YouTube channel looks to subscribers and unsubscribed visitors. This means that unsubscribed viewers would see different featured content than dedicated, subscribed viewers. Pretty cool, right?
34. Treat videos like blog posts. “Don’t waste the opportunities to drive traffic to your YouTube channel through other social media platforms. Think of it as you would a blog post. The more nurturing it gets from all of your social activities, the more traffic it will get. So tweet it, blog about it, post it on Facebook, and promote it through your email newsletters.” – Six Tips for Using YouTube for B2B Marketing, Bluetext; Twitter: @bluetext
19. Focus on entertaining instead of advertising. “If you want to advertise on YouTube, it’s best to pay via AdWords and have your advertisement promoted across the platform to relevant demographics. However, when you’re uploading videos via your own YouTube channel, stick to entertainment rather than advertising. Keep in mind how video is important in the buying cycle.
As it does, you can enter in the video’s basic information, including its name, the video description, the privacy settings, and which playlist you’d like it to appear on. You should also add tags, which helps the video show up in relevant searches. You’ll want to make sure that the video’s text is optimized for SEO; we’ll go over this in the next section.
This is where having your own YouTube channel gets more interesting. The connectivity factor in YouTube makes it a reliable social media platform. Unlike random posts and tweets, videos can easily relate to the viewers. They get to be familiar with what the videos are intended for and at times these viewers get hooked by it. That’s the reason why it’s necessary to make clear, high quality videos. Videos that don’t just promote or entertain but videos that really connects to its viewers.
As “iJustine,” Ezarik has broadened her brand outside of YouTube. She often hosts or emcees live events around the world. She’s written a book, I, Justine: An Analog Memoir (2015), and has dabbled in merchandise, mobile apps (yes, more than one), and has starred in TV commercials. Ezarik says YouTube creators could also engage YouTube’s “Super Chats,” announced in May, where fans can pay small amounts to interact with YouTubers during live streams. “Fan funding is fairly new, but these donations are another way you can make money,” says Ezarik.
After all, relatability is a YouTuber’s greatest asset — along with a willingness to keep plugging away. “If you’re passionate about it, you really increase your chances of success,” says Asano. “It’s a lot of work. To produce just one video, you need camera equipment, a computer to edit it on, and time. And if you’re just starting out, you’re not going to get paid for a while because you need to build your subscribers. Don’t do it because you think you’re going to make an easy buck, because it’s not.”
Unlike other social networking platforms, YouTube exclusively hosts video content. If you’re only creating a YouTube channel to upload one video and have no intention of maintaining the platform, you might want to reconsider. You’ll need to set aside plenty of time to plan, film, edit, market, and analyze content on a consistent basis. You’ll need to define your brand’s goals and plan for how video specifically can help you achieve these. However, if you devote an appropriate amount of time and energy into the platform, you’ll be able to create engaging, shareable content for your growing audience.
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