I believe that any vision ⚡ can be achieved with the right plan of attack. As the founder of a wellness startup, I'm well versed in what it means to build a company and a brand. In addition to giving a project life, my specialty lies in helping business owners leverage YouTube, in the most efficient and effective way possible. Having developed my own YouTube channel and having filmed and edited over 100+ videos of my own, I’m familiar with the details involved because I’ve done the work myself. I’ve studied YouTube intensely and can decipher what creates a good video, a great channel and a solid audience. Whether you’re a company or an individual simply looking to establish a presence on YouTube, or if your intention is to give it your all and commit to the platform wholeheartedly, I’m more than confident that I can guide you in the right direction. I’m available for YouTube Consultations as well as other related creative services such as: ► YouTube Channel Development ► YouTube Channel Management ► SEO Optimization of Video Content & YouTube Channel Overall ► Video Content Strategy ► Video Production ► Video Filming ► Video Editing ► YouTube Video Thumbnail Design ► YouTube Channel Art Creation ► Script Writing ► Creating a Brand Aesthetic ► Copywriting ► Editing 💡 Are you interested in YouTube but don’t want to be on camera? If you’re looking for a Brand Ambassador, I am happy to consider projects on a case-by-case basis.
Hello! My name is Paul. I excel at combining a knack for creative thinking with hard professional skills. I use this to bring a fresh perspective to the table on a broad set of skills from YouTube channel management and optimization to professional video editing and shooting to social media marketing. EDUCATION: -Finance and Entrepreneurship double major (Indiana University, Kelley School of Business) -Creative Writing minor (Indiana University) EXPERIENCE I have been doing freelance and contract work in the telecommunications field for several years now, including a 6-month contract with the NCAA communications department (March-September 2017) to solve issues they were having with email delivery and salesforce as well as help strategize for their future outreach/recruitment tactics. I have extensive experience with video editing and animation in Adobe After Effects, and Adobe Premiere Pro, ranging from dynamic streaming videos and lyric videos for musical artists to music video editing, professional/corporate video arrangement and editing, script writing and delivery, YouTube video editing, and much more. Some of my specialties include: -Video animation (professional promotional videos, logo animation sequences, etc) -YouTube channel management and optimization (both corporate and recreational) -Video arrangement, color grading, special effects, etc. - Notable clients include: The NCAA, VertiMax, Adobe Experience Cloud I draw from an education balanced between the professional work environment and creative spheres to present a blend of strong professional communication skills, critical thinking, and creative problem-solving. Some of my business-related specialties include -Business plan writing and editing -Small business consultation (corporate strategy, operations, and supply chain) -Marketing strategy and social media marketing -Professional communication -Partnerships and contracts -Non Disclosure Agreements (drafting and editing) -Business plan drafting and editing -Presentation editing I also drum for and manage 2 nationally-touring bands. This has given me excellent experience in assembling and editing EPK's (electronic press kits), as well as writing for and managing social media accounts of all kinds, analyzing and optimizing YouTube channels using YouTube analytics, search engine optimization, and using Facebook ads and analytics to maximize post reach. -EPK's (electronic press kits) -Social media management and optimization -YouTube analytics, optimization, and search result placement -Facebook ads and analytics/optimization
So, here’s the thing, you don’t want to start an online business without considering the use of videos. You may haven’t noticed it but everywhere you look, this form of content really draws in a lot of people as compared to the sole use of articles and images. Adding videos to your website is a game-changer and you can search for the numbers if you’re in doubt.
It wasn’t long ago that “content marketing” meant producing and promoting blog posts, infographics, white papers and other static media. But as the digital landscape continues to evolve, “content” is increasingly coming to be understood as “video.” YouTube—the original video platform—continues to be a big player when it comes to the most effective channels for video marketing.

YouTube was founded by Chad Hurley, Steve Chen, and Jawed Karim, when they worked for PayPal.[3] Prior to working for PayPal, Hurley studied design at the Indiana University of Pennsylvania; Chen and Karim studied computer science together at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign.[4] YouTube's initial headquarters was above a pizzeria and Japanese restaurant in San Mateo, California.[5]


“Another tip to improve the ranking of your video is to embed it directly on your blog, hopefully in an article that follows best practices for SEO and has relation with the theme. Embedding articles in your company’s blog will give them more meat and value.” – Nhorman Dario Rodriguez Rocha, Top 5 YouTube Marketing Tips for Your Business, Duo Executives
The first is that viewer attention spans- and loyalty- are a bitch. I’m even lumping in my own impatience online here; as a user, if I click to watch a tutorial, an ad pops up, and I see a similar tutorial in the “You May Also Like This” feed, I’ll give that one a shot instead. I’m not kidding. I’ve done this twice today. You don’t want to do anything that will cause viewers to lose interest in your video, or worse, to click to a competitor’s video instead.
In any case, if you have incontrovertible evidence that YouTube is actually unprofitable today, and why that is (i.e. is it because they’re just investing all that profit back into growth, or are their upkeep costs truly just on the order of multiple billions of dollars?), would love to see it and adjust this accordingly. Doesn’t really change any of the points made though.
50. Use tools available through YouTube. “Start by using the tools available directly through YouTube. For example, provide a detailed and accurate title and description to each of your videos, and associate tags (keywords) that are directly relevant.” – Jason R. Rich, 12 Strategies for Promoting Your YouTube Videos, Entrepreneur; Twitter: @Entrepreneur
YouTube ads provided a big percentage of the Segarses’ income during those early days, and worked well with their content. “Our workouts require strategically placed water breaks, which easily lends itself to monetization/ads that aren’t intrusive to the user experience,” says Segars. “People even joke about how relieved they are to see ads and get a quick minute to catch their breath.” Meanwhile, that revenue allowed them to adopt a no-sponsor policy. “It has cut out a lot of monetization opportunities, but our audience is well aware of our stance and appreciates it,” Segars continues. “We think that trust is an important part of building a brand.” As a result, they’ve roped in a loyal audience that’s now willing to pay for a variety of workout programs and meal plans for sale on the Fitness Blender website.

16. Create usable, valuable content. “First and foremost, a YouTube video should serve a purpose and give consumers a reason to visit your channel. Instead of trying to create the next viral video, focus on what type of information your clients are looking for and provide that information in an interesting and valuable way. The Home Depot’s You Tube page is a great example of crafting video content that their audience is looking for. The company’s channel is packed full of how to videos that cater to their consumer’s do it yourself attitude. Remember, your You Tube Channel is a great educational tool and one that can provide your target customer with valuable information and establish a lasting relationship with your organization.” – Payden Sewell, YouTube Marketing Tips, Full Media; Twitter: @fullmedia

YouTube will only show the first two to three lines (about 100 characters) of your video’s description, then viewers will need to click “show more” to see the rest. For that reason, be sure to include any important links or CTAs in the beginning of your description, and write the copy so it drives views and engagement. Below this, you can include the video transcript. Video transcripts can greatly improve your SEO because your video is usually full of keywords. You can also add a default channel description that includes links to your social channels, video credits, and video specific time stamps. You can also include #hashtags in your video titles and descriptions -- just be sure to use them sparingly. 
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