The online-video unit posted revenue of about $4 billion in 2014, up from $3 billion a year earlier, according to two people familiar with its financials, as advertiser-friendly moves enticed some big brands to spend more. But while YouTube accounted for about 6% of Google’s overall sales last year, it didn’t contribute to earnings. After paying for content, and the equipment to deliver speedy videos, YouTube’s bottom line is “roughly break-even,” according to a person with knowledge of the figure.

I’m sure you have seen a viral YouTube video. They come in all shapes and sizes—from super popular songs like “Watch Me (Whip/Nae Nae)” to a funny grumpy cat, someone falling down, or even something completely off the wall like Ylvis' “What Does the Fox Say?" video. What do they all have in common? Well, these posters all made a ton of money on YouTube when their videos went viral.
Before you can start getting paid, you'll need to reach the payment threshold. This varies depending on your currency. In the US, the payment threshold is $100. This means you'll need to earn $100 before you can start collecting any money. If you've hit your payment threshold, you'll be paid around the 21st of every month. If you didn't meet the threshold, that money will be rolled over into next month's amount.
“I recommend that your account picture (which you set through your Google account) is some sort of brand logo. If you’re a one-person business, it can be a professional headshot of you. Ideally, it should match your profile pictures on other social media accounts for instant brand recognition. This works both ways; if ones of your followers from another site comes across your YouTube, you want them to recognize you so they’re more likely to watch. And, vice versa, if a viewer Googles you, you want them to be sure that the Facebook profile they’re clicking on is actually you. To change your channel art, just click on it when editing your profile.” – Ana Gotter, The Beginner’s Guide to YouTube Marketing, AdEspresso; Twitter: @AdEspresso
“Additionally, such branding is important for ensuring that your viewers remember the video, which is especially handy when they need to refer someone to it. Even though they might forget the actual content and the name of the video, remembering your branded footage will help direct viewers to your channel.” – Jon Clark, 7 Vital Elements of a Successful YouTube Video, SearchEngineJournal; Twitter: @sejournal
After all that prep work, it’s finally time to start filming your video. Don’t own a fancy camera or have budget to rent one? Don’t worry! Advances in smartphone cameras have made it possible to film great content with just a phone. If you are filming your video with a phone, be sure to turn it sideways and film in landscape mode. This will prevent awkward cropping or framing when you upload the video to YouTube, which natively supports the landscape format. No matter what you’re filming with, these tips can help your video to look professional and stay engaging for your viewers.
32. Reset your thinking about YouTube channels and YouTube pages. “It’s important that you reset the way you look at YouTube channels versus YouTube pages as you begin to think about YouTube strategically. You need to think of YouTube as a kind of second website. Your channel is the homepage that anchors your YouTube website. Your videos are the webpages.
In early May, Amazon announced a new service initially designed for "professional video producers." Launch partners include media firm Conde Nast, the "How Stuff Works" website and Samuel Goldwyn Films. Amazon Video Direct could compete for the young creative talent attracted to YouTube. As does YouTube, Amazon offers revenue-sharing and royalties for content that attracts a certain level of traffic. 

In order to truly succeed on YouTube, you need to approach it differently than other social platforms. Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter revolve around both creating and sharing great content with the goal of creating awareness, engagement, and conversation. (That’s a simple definition, but for the purpose of this argument, it will work for now). It’s about actually socializing.

14. Collaborate for greater reach and views. “Collaborate in your niche. If you are a fashion brand, then find top channels in allied fields like maybe travel or hospitality and feature them on your channel and see if you can be featured on theirs. This collaboration will give your brand a wider reach and a target audience that matches your audience profile. You can even collaborate with influencers on Youtube or Vloggers and ask them to add videos around your theme/playlist. This works great if you are holding an event or wish to do a series of review/demo of your products.” – Vikrant Chaudhari, 9 Smart Tips to Boost YouTube Marketing for Your Business, SocialChamps; Twitter: @SocialChamp
For online and offline Business owners and internet marketers, YouTube Marketing is an essential strategy to take advantage of the web’s massive shift toward video. That’s why it’s so important to learn and test some strategies and to get help from Digital Organics right now. It will give you a huge leg up on your competition, helping your business to move forward.
From the looks of things, YouTube's top-line growth hasn't been hurt much by worries among some companies -- for example, Cisco Systems (CSCO) , which just announced it's halting its YouTube ad spend -- about the running of their ads against content they find to be inappropriate. It also doesn't appear to have been hurt badly by YouTube's attempts to appease such advertisers by "demonetizing" videos that its algorithms deem unsuitable for running ads against, or the backlash such actions have sparked among affected content creators.
Make your videos with a specific type of person in mind.  This is basic advertising 101; identifying your target demographic.  Don’t tell me that your demographics are 21 – 55 year old women.  This is the shotgun approach that’s too general and vague.  Do you talk to a 21 year old girl the same way you’d talk to a 55 year old lady?  Of course not.  Define your audience and create videos that’s catered to them.
During November 2011, the Google+ social networking site was integrated directly with YouTube and the Chrome web browser, allowing YouTube videos to be viewed from within the Google+ interface.[46] In December 2011, YouTube launched a new version of the site interface, with the video channels displayed in a central column on the home page, similar to the news feeds of social networking sites.[47] At the same time, a new version of the YouTube logo was introduced with a darker shade of red, which was the first change in design since October 2006.[48]
32. Reset your thinking about YouTube channels and YouTube pages. “It’s important that you reset the way you look at YouTube channels versus YouTube pages as you begin to think about YouTube strategically. You need to think of YouTube as a kind of second website. Your channel is the homepage that anchors your YouTube website. Your videos are the webpages.

Just like with on-page SEO, it’s important to optimize your video’s title and description. The title is the first thing people will read when scrolling through a list of videos, so make sure it’s clear and compelling -- it should make searchers curious about the content or be instantly clear that your video will help them solve a problem. Do some keyword research to better understand what viewers are searching for. Include the most important information and keywords in the beginning of your title. Finally, keep titles to around 60 characters to keep text from being cut off in results pages.
×