The second view is e.g. taken by Christian Fuchs in his book "Internet and Society". He argues that YouTube is an example of a business model that is based on combining the gift with the commodity. The first is free, the second yields profit. The novel aspect of this business strategy is that it combines what seems at first to be different, the gift and the commodity. YouTube would give free access to its users, the more users, the more profit it can potentially make because it can in principle increase advertisement rates and will gain further interest of advertisers.[135] YouTube would sell its audience that it gains by free access to its advertising customers.[135]:181
Observers speculate Google has sought streaming rights to on-demand TV shows and movies to bolster YouTube Red, its new subscription service. Some media reports suggest Google could go a step further and buy rights to live TV channels, making it a more direct foe of pay TV providers such as Comcast (CMCSA), AT&T (T) and Verizon Communications (VZ). Google is usually mentioned when broadcasting rights to major sports are up for grabs.

In 2017, YouTube is predicted to evolve even further, making more changes that will benefit companies who incorporate it into their social media and video marketing strategies. From added profile and socialization features for better audience connection to exploring long-form, television style content, YouTube is expected to make some major upgrades this year.

I’m sure you have seen a viral YouTube video. They come in all shapes and sizes—from super popular songs like “Watch Me (Whip/Nae Nae)” to a funny grumpy cat, someone falling down, or even something completely off the wall like Ylvis' “What Does the Fox Say?" video. What do they all have in common? Well, these posters all made a ton of money on YouTube when their videos went viral.
In order for a YouTuber to get paid for an ad, the viewer of their video must have Ad-Block turned off (meaning they will see all the ads on videos) and must watch at least 30 seconds of videos they could otherwise skip. Or, this will work if the viewer sees smaller ads like banner ads, according to YouTuber Mah-Dry-Bread. The money generated from the viewer watching these ads is split between YouTube and your channel.
After you upload a video, YouTube will allow you to choose a video category under “Advanced settings.” Video categories help to group your video with related content on the platform. YouTube allows you to sort your video into one of the following categories: Film & Animation, Autos & Vehicles, Music, Pets & Animals, Sports, Travel & Events, Gaming, People & Blogs, Comedy, Entertainment, News & Politics, Howto & Style, Educations, Science & Technology, and Nonprofits & Activism.
Enabling monetization means that you agree you will only upload video content that you have the rights for and that you will play by the rules (such as not watching your own video over and over to boost ads). Google AdSense is the way you set up your payment information for when you actually start making money. I’ve posted links in the show notes of today’s episode so that you don’t have to hunt around for these links.
27. Maximize engagement. “Did you know the more comments a video has, the higher it is likely to rank on YouTube? Brian Dean from BackLinko found comment counts to strongly correlate with rankings, after analyzing 1.3 million YouTube videos to better understand how the platform’s search engine works… The more comments a video has, the higher it ranks. Considering YouTube’s emphasis on user engagement, this isn’t too surprising. For this reason, it’s extremely important to encourage viewers to interact with your videos. Close your videos by encouraging viewers to ‘like’ and ‘comment below.’
Until last month, pretty much any random person could enable the “monetization” setting on their YouTube account and get ads on their videos, allowing them to earn a fraction of a cent for every time a person viewed or clicked on their content. That all changed in January, however, when Google (YouTube’s owner) announced new standards to merit those ads. Now, to be accepted into the “YouTube Partner Program” and monetize your channel, you need a minimum of 1,000 subscribers and 4,000 hours of watch-time over the past 12 months; your videos will also be more closely monitored for inappropriate content. Meanwhile, YouTube also promised that members of “Google Preferred” — a vaunted group of popular channels that make up YouTube’s top 5 percent, and command higher ad dollars because of it — will be more carefully vetted. (These shifts followed the Logan Paul controversy, as well as a brouhaha about ads running on unsavory content, such as sexually explicit or extremist videos.)
YouTube, just like marketing, is evolving. What once used to be a platform for amateur videographers is now more than one billion active users strong. Marketers are learning that YouTube is a powerful tool; in fact, the 2017 State of Inbound report shows that 48% of all marketers plan to add YouTube as a content distribution channel in the next 12 months. Video isn’t just a passing trend, either: nearly 87% of marketers use video for content marketing campaigns, and Cisco predicts that 80% of all internet traffic will be streaming videos by 2019. The need for marketers to use video to reach their audiences is more critical now than ever before.
YouTube already offers advertisers the opportunity to withdraw from advertising on some videos – such as LGBTQ content or discussions of mental health – if it doesn’t sit well alongside a brand’s message. It was revealed last year that this can sometimes then lead to content being demonetised. In other words, the creator does not receive a share of ad revenue for that video.
There are other views in the debate that agree with Tapscott and Williams that it is increasingly based on harnessing open source/content, networking, sharing, and peering, but they argue that the result is not an economic democracy, but a subtle form and deepening of exploitation, in which labour costs are reduced by Internet-based global outsourcing.
There has been an overhaul in ad content lately, due to controversy when ads were being shown on videos that contained extremism, hate speech, and other content businesses did not want to be associated with. Now, channels of arms dealers, political commentators, and even video games have seen fewer ads on their content. This only really affects those who are trying to monetize their YouTube by placing ads on their site, not so much for those running the ads.

The good news is that income is rising, but efforts to generate a broad and loyal audience that turn to the service on a regular basis for original content appear to have hit a wall. The Journal points out how three years ago YouTube spent hundreds of millions of dollars on original content to build new channels, only to see many of them fail. Getting people to visit the site directly and regularly because there’s something specific they want to see, rather than dropping by occasionally via a link on another site or online service, appears to be a big challenge for the company.

As more advertising dollars flow to YouTube, it's making the already hugely profitable Google even more prosperous. On Thursday, Google's corporate parent — Alphabet Inc., based in Mountain View, Calif. — said the company overall earned $5.1 billion, or $7.25 a share in the third quarter, up 27% from the same quarter last year. After subtracting advertising commissions, revenue climbed 21% to $18.3 billion. Both figures beat analyst projections.


20. Focus on the quality of your content. “Don’t worry about the production quality of your videos—especially when you first start creating video content. The quality of your content is more important than the production quality of your videos. Your first priority should be making videos that are both helpful and entertaining for your target audience.
46. Put the hook in the first burst of your message. “You only have a few seconds to make your message stick. In those precious moments, it’s crucial to have your brand message heard. Before posting the content, it’s important to ask yourself, ‘Can a viewer get a persuasive glimpse of what they’re about to watch?’ Whether your video is entertaining, informative, sarcastic, or best of all, authentic, be sure the first burst of your message has the hook they need to keep watching.” – Dustin Kapper, As Seen on YouTube: Tips for Video Marketing, PepperGang; Twitter: @Pepper_Gang

I've edited 600+ social videos in 11 years for CBS, Absolut Vodka, Reuters, and others. I've been trusted to create effective social media videos for top rated shows, TV specials and clients like: • CSI • Victoria's Secret Fashion Show • Supergirl • The Grammys • Survivor • Absolut Vodka • The Big Bang Theory • The Kennedy Center Honors • NCIS • Blue Bloods • Criminal Minds • Amazing Race • Celebrity Big Brother My videos have appeared prominently on the websites of: • Entertainment Weekly • US Weekly • E! • Hollywood Reporter • CBS • as well as on their respective YouTube, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram pages. "I have had the pleasure of collaborating with Chris on hundreds of CBS projects. He has approached all of his tasks with the utmost dedication and critical discipline. Over the years he has emerged as a critical thinker and creative genius who with his strong sense of style and design brings a stylistic flair to every video content project we have worked together on." - Robert Winsor, Senior VP, CBS Media Group I specialize in editing and optimizing video for social media platforms like: YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and IGTV. I can take your raw footage and tell your story in one to five minutes in a slick, professional, polished piece sure to get eyeballs hooked. I am thorough, easy to work with and always available by phone. Want me for your next project? 1. First - Click the "Hire Now" button to invite me to your job. 2. Fill out "hire" form and propose a project. 3. We will discuss the project via phone or Upwork message. 4. I begin working on your video. If that sounds right for you, just click the green "Hire Now" button and we can start.
YouTube will only show the first two to three lines (about 100 characters) of your video’s description, then viewers will need to click “show more” to see the rest. For that reason, be sure to include any important links or CTAs in the beginning of your description, and write the copy so it drives views and engagement. Below this, you can include the video transcript. Video transcripts can greatly improve your SEO because your video is usually full of keywords. You can also add a default channel description that includes links to your social channels, video credits, and video specific time stamps. You can also include #hashtags in your video titles and descriptions -- just be sure to use them sparingly. 
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