Once you determine how often you can post, you should also consider when you release your videos. According to Oberlo, most viewers watch YouTube videos in the evenings and on weekends. The best time to post your content is early afternoons during the week or early Saturday and Sunday mornings so that your videos will be indexed by the time your potential viewers are searching.

Don’t go overboard with this type of content, though. You’ve probably seen some commercials and had no idea what the message was until the very end, which left you confused about the company. Make sure that your videos evoke the emotions you want customers to feel about your company, even if there isn’t a direct connection between your video content and the product you’re ultimately promoting.


Used by countless popular YouTubers, Patreon is a site that allows viewers to donate monthly to their favorite YouTubers, and in turn, allows the YouTuber to (if so desired) give rewards back to the viewers. And, despite the site taking about 10% of the donations for themselves, most YouTubers make more money through Patreon than their own channel, according to Bustle.
Consider start-up costs. Your start-up costs largely depend on the type of content you're putting out. For "Pittsburgh Dad," the cost to launch the show was virtually nothing, Preksta says. The first episode required just three supplies: Preksta's iPhone, a polo shirt from Goodwill and a pair of glasses. The show hasn't required much of an investment in technology since, "At the end of the day, it's me, Curt and a couple of lights," Preksta says.
“We are still in investment mode,” Wojcicki said at the Fortune Most Powerful Women summit in Laguna Niguel, Calif. on Tuesday. She explained further that the declining TV viewership of people in the 18 to 34-year-old segment represents a massive opportunity for her team, which Google (googl) bought for $1.6 billion in 2006. Areas where they are investing, she added, include virtual reality. “There’s no timetable,” she said, referring to a question on profitability.
After all, relatability is a YouTuber’s greatest asset — along with a willingness to keep plugging away. “If you’re passionate about it, you really increase your chances of success,” says Asano. “It’s a lot of work. To produce just one video, you need camera equipment, a computer to edit it on, and time. And if you’re just starting out, you’re not going to get paid for a while because you need to build your subscribers. Don’t do it because you think you’re going to make an easy buck, because it’s not.”
YouTube has a library of free sound effects and music to use in your videos. Some other great resources for royalty free music are Pond5, Epidemic Sound, and PremiumBeat. Both services include thousands of professionally recorded and produced songs in a multitude of genres at varying lengths and tempos. PremiumBeat and Pond5 both include a large library of sound effects to add texture and depth to your videos. Sometimes, it only takes a subtle sound effect layer in the background of a scene to elevate the production quality of your video and really pull your audience into the story.
Next up you’ll want to become a YouTube Partner. This isn’t as hard as it used to be. In the past, to become a YouTube partner you had to have some 15,000 hours of your video watched at any point in time. The benefit here is that you can upload more than 15 minutes of video, which may help on some video projects. You also get analytics tools and some more advanced editing tools.
When researching keywords, I recommend doing keyword research both for Google, and specifically for YouTube. This way, you’ll make sure that you’re ranking as best you can on both search engines, increasing views significantly. Any of the top keyword research tools will work for Google (I discuss them in-depth here), and I most recommend keywordtool.io’s YouTube-specific search. Prioritize the keywords you find in the YouTube search, as this will be your best bet for being found.
Take your videos from dull to dynamic. Whether it's a sweet-potato-pancake recipe for YouTube, an Insta story highlighting your trip to Eastern Europe, or a FB shoutout showing off your latest yoga move, I've got you covered. As a GF globe-trotting yogi I love helping travel & wellness companies achieve their video goals. Because I believe in what you are doing, truly (I say as I munch on my ghee-cooked kale and drool over pictures of El Salvador, my next travel goal). I offer you... 5+ years experience Adobe Premiere Pro 7+ years experience Adobe Photoshop Basic Adobe After Effects editing for graphics, titles and more! ...because you need your videos to look great. You need them to knock the socks off your clients and wow your mother-in-law. You need them to make you famous (and more importantly, make you money). So click the hire button. You know you wanna. (P.S. I can also design you a kick-butt website in WiX)
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Certified in Google AdWords specializing in search, display and mobile advertising. Thorough knowledge of e-mail marketing & automation. Graphic design skills and knowledge of all Adobe programs. Experience in print, video, audio and digital advertising/marketing for over 5 years. Past and current jobs have provided me with the skills to become an all in one marketing maverick. With experience on both the creative and account side at a Manhattan advertising agency, I excel at creating a marketing strategy, creating the artwork, executing the strategy/campaign and providing detailed analysis when all is finished. I am certified in Google AdWords Fundamentals, Search & Mobile advertising along with proficiency as a Facebook Ads Manager, Social Media Manager for LinkedIn, Twitter & Instagram. I also maintain knowledge of Adobe Programs such as, Indesign, Photoshop, After Effects, Illustrator and Dreamweaver, and with a thorough knowledge of Microsoft Office, especially in Publisher & Excel.
“…’So I really do believe that it’s not about the quality of your camera or your equipment. It’s about the value of the content you’re creating and how much you’re actually going to answer people’s questions or solve people’s problems. And that’s true of so many different videos on YouTube. There are videos that have millions of views that were shot on an iPhone.'” – Sunny Lenarduzzi as quoted by Tyler Basu in Top 3 YouTube Video Marketing Tips from Sunny Lenarduzzi, Influencive; Twitter: @Influencive
You don’t need expensive hardware to get going. Content is far more important than having 4K or 360-degree video. Great quality helps, but today’s smartphones are more than good enough to start with. That said, good lighting is very important: natural is great, if you can be outdoors, or near a window, or pick up some lighting kits that start at a couple of hundred dollars. Clear audio is critical, too; you can buy a highly-rated clip-on lavalier (“lav”) mic starting at only $23.
Like any good campaign or content generation, it’s important to establish what you want to accomplish with your video before you get into the nuts and bolts of bringing it to life. Do you want to increase awareness for your brand? Drive inbound website traffic? Add subscribers to your channel? Increase social shares? Or do something else entirely? Establishing a singular goal at the start of the production process is key and will allow you to focus the video’s script and strategy on accomplishing it. It’s perfectly OK to have multiple goals for your YouTube channel, like increasing brand awareness and adding subscribers, but the best practice is to focus on one goal per video. 
YouTube also has a more democratic appeal. Unlike Instagram, where the biggest influencers are mainstream megastars in their own right (Selena Gomez, Ariana Grande, Beyoncé), YouTube is dominated by homegrown celebrities, such as Jenna Mourey (a.k.a. Jenna Marbles), Mariand Castrejón Castañeda (a.k.a. Yuya, a Mexican beauty vlogger), and a bunch of gamers that I’ve never heard of but have millions of fans. The world’s highest-paid YouTube star is Daniel Middleton, a British 26-year-old who goes by “DanTDM” and gained his fortune (an estimated annual income of $16.5 million, per Forbes) by posting videos of himself playing Minecraft. Last year, he did an international tour that included four sold-out nights at the Sydney Opera House.
Until last month, pretty much any random person could enable the “monetization” setting on their YouTube account and get ads on their videos, allowing them to earn a fraction of a cent for every time a person viewed or clicked on their content. That all changed in January, however, when Google (YouTube’s owner) announced new standards to merit those ads. Now, to be accepted into the “YouTube Partner Program” and monetize your channel, you need a minimum of 1,000 subscribers and 4,000 hours of watch-time over the past 12 months; your videos will also be more closely monitored for inappropriate content. Meanwhile, YouTube also promised that members of “Google Preferred” — a vaunted group of popular channels that make up YouTube’s top 5 percent, and command higher ad dollars because of it — will be more carefully vetted. (These shifts followed the Logan Paul controversy, as well as a brouhaha about ads running on unsavory content, such as sexually explicit or extremist videos.)
While not directly related to YouTube, you can use your YouTube platform to build up a following and reputation, and eventually direct your viewers to other paid platforms, like Yondo. This platform allows you to create your own kind of video store, where you can sell special videos (either on a subscription basis or pay-per-view). And, the best part? You can set your own price. 
Fancy becoming a YouTuber? You first need to figure out your passion – whether it’s gadgets, celebrity gossip, religion, politics, pets, make-up, and so on. “The most important thing is find out what you want make videos about, and have fun,” says Ezarik. “It’s also ideal if you’re doing something unique, some niche content, you can become the best at.” Create a free YouTube channel. Sign up for AdSense to monetize your videos (see below).
When researching keywords, I recommend doing keyword research both for Google, and specifically for YouTube. This way, you’ll make sure that you’re ranking as best you can on both search engines, increasing views significantly. Any of the top keyword research tools will work for Google (I discuss them in-depth here), and I most recommend keywordtool.io’s YouTube-specific search. Prioritize the keywords you find in the YouTube search, as this will be your best bet for being found.
34. Treat videos like blog posts. “Don’t waste the opportunities to drive traffic to your YouTube channel through other social media platforms. Think of it as you would a blog post. The more nurturing it gets from all of your social activities, the more traffic it will get. So tweet it, blog about it, post it on Facebook, and promote it through your email newsletters.” – Six Tips for Using YouTube for B2B Marketing, Bluetext; Twitter: @bluetext
45. Optimize your videos and playlists for watch time. “Industry expert Mark Robertson confirmed that since October 2012, YouTube’s algorithm has prioritized videos that lead to longer overall watch time or viewing sessions, rather than videos that get more views. So, if viewers watch your videos – and suggested videos – beyond the first view, then your videos are more likely to be ranked highly in YouTube’s search results and related videos.
So, here’s the thing, you don’t want to start an online business without considering the use of videos. You may haven’t noticed it but everywhere you look, this form of content really draws in a lot of people as compared to the sole use of articles and images. Adding videos to your website is a game-changer and you can search for the numbers if you’re in doubt.
The first step to becoming a YouTube marketing pro is creating and optimizing your video’s metadata. Simply put, metadata gives viewers information about your video, which includes your video title, description, tags, category, thumbnail, subtitles, and closed captions. Providing the right information in your video’s metadata will help to ensure that it is properly indexed by YouTube and appears when people are searching for videos like yours. Be succinct and straightforward when filling out your metadata -- your content could be removed if you try to promote it with unrelated keywords. Check out the video and tips below to learn more about optimizing your video for search.
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