After all that prep work, it’s finally time to start filming your video. Don’t own a fancy camera or have budget to rent one? Don’t worry! Advances in smartphone cameras have made it possible to film great content with just a phone. If you are filming your video with a phone, be sure to turn it sideways and film in landscape mode. This will prevent awkward cropping or framing when you upload the video to YouTube, which natively supports the landscape format. No matter what you’re filming with, these tips can help your video to look professional and stay engaging for your viewers.
The good news is that income is rising, but efforts to generate a broad and loyal audience that turn to the service on a regular basis for original content appear to have hit a wall. The Journal points out how three years ago YouTube spent hundreds of millions of dollars on original content to build new channels, only to see many of them fail. Getting people to visit the site directly and regularly because there’s something specific they want to see, rather than dropping by occasionally via a link on another site or online service, appears to be a big challenge for the company.
For each scene, make sure you film from a few positions so you can edit between the clips. For an interview or video focused on a single individual, this may mean moving the camera from facing the scene head on to filming from a 45-degree angle. You can also try to move the camera closer and further away or zooming in and out for more variety. Cutting between different angles and distances will keep your video visually interesting and engaging for your viewers. 
Like any good campaign or content generation, it’s important to establish what you want to accomplish with your video before you get into the nuts and bolts of bringing it to life. Do you want to increase awareness for your brand? Drive inbound website traffic? Add subscribers to your channel? Increase social shares? Or do something else entirely? Establishing a singular goal at the start of the production process is key and will allow you to focus the video’s script and strategy on accomplishing it. It’s perfectly OK to have multiple goals for your YouTube channel, like increasing brand awareness and adding subscribers, but the best practice is to focus on one goal per video. 
29. Prioritize the visual appeal of your YouTube channel. “Next, work on the visual appeal of your channel. Describe what the channel is all about and add links to relevant content that you may have shared in websites and other platforms. This makes it easier for visitors who want to check your credentials again or learn what your brand is all about. Do not neglect the margins on the left and right side of your channel. Use them to showcase pictures and other content related to your brand.” – Maryanne Gaitho, How to Make YouTube Your Social Media Marketing Tool, SimpliLearn.com; Twitter: @simplilearn

Advertisers only pay when someone clicks an ad or watches for 30 seconds.  This is why you can’t tie your channel views to dollars.  If your video gets ten million views but nobody watches or click the ads, you don’t make any money.  This is how I’m able to make $1 per 25 views.  Advertisers pay big money to get their ad in front of specific and targeted audience.

Before you start filming video content, you’ll need to set up your YouTube channel. This can get a bit complicated. As you probably know, YouTube is owned by Google. As a result, when you sign up for a Gmail account, you’ll automatically have access to a YouTube account, a Google+ account, and much more. Depending on your business, you may not want to tie your email to your business’s YouTube channel, especially if you need to share access to the account with team members or an agency partner. We suggest that you create a common email account that can be used by multiple people.
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