In any case, if you have incontrovertible evidence that YouTube is actually unprofitable today, and why that is (i.e. is it because they’re just investing all that profit back into growth, or are their upkeep costs truly just on the order of multiple billions of dollars?), would love to see it and adjust this accordingly. Doesn’t really change any of the points made though.
YouTube is one of the most popular websites on the planet, receiving billions of views a year and paying out millions to the content creators that it hosts. Money earned through YouTube is generated by advertisements. Content creators who host ads on their videos receive about half of the ad revenue those ads generate, while YouTube takes the rest. Anyone can monetize their videos, as long as their videos do not break copyright law.

It's the perfect option for videos managed by charities and nonprofits, but even for-profit businesses and independent creatives can publish videos and YouTube Live streams that encourage contributions from their audience. Streaming platforms such as Twitch.tv, which webcasts video games and general interest content, sees accounts that are two years or older make $80 in "tips" per year on average.
I co-create with my clients to help build their brand awareness and story online with creative media creation via graphic design, youtube optimized videos and unique social media campaigns to grow their online audience. Using the elements of internet crafted video editing, graphic design, web design, growth marketing tools & social media management. We support 'positive change makers', shifting to a healthier more sustainable consumerism mentality and a balanced way of life. I am a YouTube marketing consultant, Video Editor, Graphic Designer and social media growth strategist based in Denver, Colorado. I've worked at two of the top YouTube networks, Maker Studios & DanceOn providing channel management, social media organic growth & brand development in Los Angeles. Currently freelancing offering consultant meetings in accordance to agreed social media, general marketing goals, brand development & custom YouTube strategies. I am ambitious, honest, forward thinking and entrepreneurial. I have done video editing for over 18 years and like to create spotlight stories on new and emerging businesses. I have been in the world of new media for the past several years but come from a background in film production. I majored in web design & Interactive media at the Illinois Institute of Art, and have traveled to 37 countries! Always looking to bring innovative & creative ideas to the forefront.
Wait for approval. If you are rejected from the program, you must wait two months before applying again. If approved, you'll be allowed to choose the type of ads you want run on your videos. As of 2011, YouTube partners receive 68 percent of the profit their videos generate through advertising, so advertising your videos and nurturing your followers helps you turn a profit even faster.
“Even if advertisers are paying a decent amount to promote their products through video ads, only a portion of their expenditures ever make it into content creators’ pockets,” says entrepreneur Michael Johnston. “For example, if advertisers are paying an average of $20 per 1,000 ad impressions, the videos where those ads are being shown may only generate $2 or $3 per 1,000 views.”
It's worth noting here that even Twitter (TWTR) , which is seeing minuscule monthly user and ad revenue growth, is valued at more than seven times its 2018 revenue consensus. And Snap (SNAP) , which (though seeing strong revenue growth) is contending with slowing user growth and faces big questions about its long-term profitability, is worth over 11 times its 2018 revenue consensus.
For other YouTube creators, ad dollars only go so far, and a significant portion of revenue comes from sponsorships and “affiliate marketing” (when brands offer a commission on any sales or traffic that the creator’s content drives). Affiliates function pretty seamlessly through YouTube; anyone can include links to featured products in their video’s caption, and when audience members click through and buy them, that YouTube channel gets a small kickback. Many YouTubers prefer Amazon’s affiliate program, “Amazon associates,” although there are plenty more to choose from.
Wait for approval. If you are rejected from the program, you must wait two months before applying again. If approved, you'll be allowed to choose the type of ads you want run on your videos. As of 2011, YouTube partners receive 68 percent of the profit their videos generate through advertising, so advertising your videos and nurturing your followers helps you turn a profit even faster.
Professional quality music and sound effects can often be the difference between a successful video and one that comes off as an amateur production. Fortunately, cinema quality sounds are now readily available, even if your videos don’t have Hollywood-size budgets. When selecting music for your video, it’s important to first consider the overall mood you’d like to create. Music is one of the most valuable tools for setting the tone of a video and often informs the editing style, camera movement, and on-camera action. If you’re introducing your brand to a new audience, you probably want to select music that is upbeat and energetic. The second key part to picking music is to make sure you have the necessary permissions to use the song. What you’re looking for here are songs marked as “royalty free.” This doesn’t mean the music will be free, but it does mean you only pay a flat rate to use the music and won’t have to pay additional royalties or licensing fees on top of that.
Before you start filming, you need to decide what type of video would help you achieve your goal. In a recent article from the Huffington Post, companies seeing the highest rates of success on YouTube ranked different types of videos by their level of importance and effectiveness. Before you start thinking of ideas, filming, and editing your video, consider this list of video types.
I’m sure you have seen a viral YouTube video. They come in all shapes and sizes—from super popular songs like “Watch Me (Whip/Nae Nae)” to a funny grumpy cat, someone falling down, or even something completely off the wall like Ylvis' “What Does the Fox Say?" video. What do they all have in common? Well, these posters all made a ton of money on YouTube when their videos went viral.
Does your company have a relationship with another company that has a great YouTube presence? Ask them to collaborate! Collaborating with others is a fun way for both channels to gain exposure to another audience. Create a video or playlist together. There are a lot of options to creatively collaborate with other brands, just make sure that their audience and goal is similar to yours. The partnership should align with your  marketing strategy. 

“Your channel trailer video is prime real estate – and one of the most important ways to hook non-subscribers. It’s important to remember your channel trailer will ONLY be seen by people who are NEW to your channel. In other words, you should speak directly to new visitors.” – Noah Kagan, How to Get 100,000 YouTube Subscribers by 2018, OkDork; Twitter: @noahkagan

Now that your YouTube channel is up and running, let’s talk about search. Remember how we mentioned that YouTube is the second largest search engine? While creating engaging content is a must, it’s not the only factor for success. There are several things you can do to optimize your videos to rank highly on both YouTube and in Google search results.

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