User entitlement -- A key to the plan of scaling up and eventually figuring out how to make money is free services for users. The minute you charge people, most walk off, particularly when they've been trained to assume that services should be free. YouTube has clearly told people that they should expect free video streaming, even if it has considered an ad-free paid subscription service. Getting consumers to change their behavior after they've become used to not paying is next to impossible.
YouTube already offers advertisers the opportunity to withdraw from advertising on some videos – such as LGBTQ content or discussions of mental health – if it doesn’t sit well alongside a brand’s message. It was revealed last year that this can sometimes then lead to content being demonetised. In other words, the creator does not receive a share of ad revenue for that video.
Optimize the watching experience — Improve your search presence and connect with your audience by using optimization tactics for your videos. This includes uploading Featured Content for current subscribers or a Channel Trailer for visitors. You could also curate your videos into appropriate playlists. This will organize your content and encourage viewers to continue watching.
Used by countless popular YouTubers, Patreon is a site that allows viewers to donate monthly to their favorite YouTubers, and in turn, allows the YouTuber to (if so desired) give rewards back to the viewers. And, despite the site taking about 10% of the donations for themselves, most YouTubers make more money through Patreon than their own channel, according to Bustle.

Infrastructure costs -- The concept of free user services and scaling to eventually make them pay depends on the negligible price of adding additional consumers. But video is demanding of bandwidth and storage. Even if those are cheap in general, once you're handling as much material as the service does, it means big expenses for infrastructure. Although those costs won't scale linearly with the increased number of users, they do grow.
Did you know that the top listing in Google’s organic search results gets an average of 34% of the clicks? The second gets around 20%. The third gets 13%… That means all the rest of the results on page one (paid and organic) fight over the remaining 16%. The paid results only get about 5% of the traffic — it’s a horrible affliction referred to as “ad blindness.”
How-to videos: How-to videos tend to perform very well because they provide a lot of value to the viewer. For example, if you were selling social media software, you could create how-to videos showing your viewers how to get started with Twitter marketing or how to grow your Facebook following. You can look to top performing blog posts for material for these videos, or you can develop a plan for a recurring series. JetBlue has a series of “Flight Etiquette” videos that emphasize how not to travel:
It's a little awkward, so we'll get straight to the point: This Monday we humbly ask you to defend Wikipedia's independence. We depend on donations averaging about $16.36. But 98% of our readers in the U.S. are not responding to our messages, and time is running out to help in 2018. If everyone reading this gave $2.75, we could keep Wikipedia thriving for years to come. The price of your Monday coffee is all we need. When we made Wikipedia a non-profit, people warned us we'd regret it. But if Wikipedia were commercial, it would be a great loss. Wikipedia unites all of us who love knowledge: contributors, readers and the donors who keep us thriving. The heart and soul of Wikipedia is a community of people working to bring you unlimited access to reliable information. Please take a minute to help us keep Wikipedia growing. Thank you.
I've edited 600+ social videos in 11 years for CBS, Absolut Vodka, Reuters, and others. I've been trusted to create effective social media videos for top rated shows, TV specials and clients like: • CSI • Victoria's Secret Fashion Show • Supergirl • The Grammys • Survivor • Absolut Vodka • The Big Bang Theory • The Kennedy Center Honors • NCIS • Blue Bloods • Criminal Minds • Amazing Race • Celebrity Big Brother My videos have appeared prominently on the websites of: • Entertainment Weekly • US Weekly • E! • Hollywood Reporter • CBS • as well as on their respective YouTube, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram pages. "I have had the pleasure of collaborating with Chris on hundreds of CBS projects. He has approached all of his tasks with the utmost dedication and critical discipline. Over the years he has emerged as a critical thinker and creative genius who with his strong sense of style and design brings a stylistic flair to every video content project we have worked together on." - Robert Winsor, Senior VP, CBS Media Group I specialize in editing and optimizing video for social media platforms like: YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and IGTV. I can take your raw footage and tell your story in one to five minutes in a slick, professional, polished piece sure to get eyeballs hooked. I am thorough, easy to work with and always available by phone. Want me for your next project? 1. First - Click the "Hire Now" button to invite me to your job. 2. Fill out "hire" form and propose a project. 3. We will discuss the project via phone or Upwork message. 4. I begin working on your video. If that sounds right for you, just click the green "Hire Now" button and we can start.
While you’re on the quest to find and attract new customers and leads, don’t forget about the ones you already have. Share your video content and channel with relevant email lists. Encourage your contacts to check out a blog post you’ve embedded a video in to increase both the video and website traffic or direct them to a relevant playlist you’ve curated. Sending an email newsletter with valuable information and content is a great way to keep your contacts engaged.
If your end goal is to actually make money from videos, there’s a far better option than simply relying on your measly allocation of ad revenue. Instead, create a YouTube channel and build an audience. The primary goal is to engage this audience and build a brand name. Then, once you've established a reputation, begin driving traffic to your own landing pages where you can up-sell viewers with premium video content.
Before you start filming video content, you’ll need to set up your YouTube channel. This can get a bit complicated. As you probably know, YouTube is owned by Google. As a result, when you sign up for a Gmail account, you’ll automatically have access to a YouTube account, a Google+ account, and much more. Depending on your business, you may not want to tie your email to your business’s YouTube channel, especially if you need to share access to the account with team members or an agency partner. We suggest that you create a common email account that can be used by multiple people.
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