Professional quality music and sound effects can often be the difference between a successful video and one that comes off as an amateur production. Fortunately, cinema quality sounds are now readily available, even if your videos don’t have Hollywood-size budgets. When selecting music for your video, it’s important to first consider the overall mood you’d like to create. Music is one of the most valuable tools for setting the tone of a video and often informs the editing style, camera movement, and on-camera action. If you’re introducing your brand to a new audience, you probably want to select music that is upbeat and energetic. The second key part to picking music is to make sure you have the necessary permissions to use the song. What you’re looking for here are songs marked as “royalty free.” This doesn’t mean the music will be free, but it does mean you only pay a flat rate to use the music and won’t have to pay additional royalties or licensing fees on top of that.
You should focus on targeting one goal per video. Some of the most common video goals are to increase brand awareness or views, clicks, or inbound links and social shares . Depending on how you use the video in your marketing material, the goal could be to increase the open rate of an email series or improve the conversion rate on a landing page. YouTube is a great platform for growing brand awareness.
“So, use YouTube Analytics to see what videos are successful at keeping viewers watching. Pay close attention to the Watch Time report and Audience Retention report. Keep viewers watching each of your videos by using effective editing techniques to maintain and build interest throughout each video. Then, direct viewers to watch more content by adding end screens to each of your videos. Next, build your subscriber base, because subscribers are your most loyal fans and will be notified of new videos and playlists to watch. Finally, build longer watch-time sessions for your content by using playlists and creating a regular release schedule to encourage viewers to watch sets of your videos instead of just single videos.” – Greg Jarboe, 3 Big YouTube Numbers Video Marketers Need to Care About, Tubular Insights; Twitter: @tubularinsights
"Whether your business is closer to Boeing or P&G, or more like YouTube or flickr, there are vast pools of external talent that you can tap with the right approach. Companies that adopt these models can drive important changes in their industries and rewrite the rules of competition"[134]:270 "new business models for open content will not come from traditional media establishments, but from companies such as Google, Yahoo, and YouTube. This new generation of companies is not burned by the legacies that inhibit the publishing incumbents, so they can be much more agile in responding to customer demands. More important, they understand that you don't need to control the quantity and destiny of bits if they can provide compelling venues in which people build communities around sharing and remixing content. Free content is just the lure on which they layer revenue from advertising and premium services".[134]:271sq
13. Build traffic to your site. “Add links to your Social Media profiles and websites into your description area of your video. This will help people find you no matter how many views your video gets. Let them know how they can see similar videos of interest from you.” – Chris N. West, These 17 Marketing Tips Will Get You the Best Results from YouTube, ChrisNWest.com; Twitter: @ChrisNWest
Consider start-up costs. Your start-up costs largely depend on the type of content you're putting out. For "Pittsburgh Dad," the cost to launch the show was virtually nothing, Preksta says. The first episode required just three supplies: Preksta's iPhone, a polo shirt from Goodwill and a pair of glasses. The show hasn't required much of an investment in technology since, "At the end of the day, it's me, Curt and a couple of lights," Preksta says.
Unlike other social networking platforms, YouTube exclusively hosts video content. If you’re only creating a YouTube channel to upload one video and have no intention of maintaining the platform, you might want to reconsider. You’ll need to set aside plenty of time to plan, film, edit, market, and analyze content on a consistent basis. You’ll need to define your brand’s goals and plan for how video specifically can help you achieve these. However, if you devote an appropriate amount of time and energy into the platform, you’ll be able to create engaging, shareable content for your growing audience.
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