18. Find the right influencers. “It is the age of digital celebrities; or as they are called – Influencers. These are the people who get people to not just think about your brand, but also buy from you! Unlike the traditional celebrities, these digital stars still work their regular jobs and do regular stuff that their followers can relate to. They have a dedicated audience unlike movie stars or celebs who have a large but detached fan base. Also, brand endorsements seem like a natural fit in their content because the sole purpose of their online presence is to share their life with their fans. Measurement of the ROI for such influencer campaigns is also easier when compared to a celebrity endorsement.” – Aravinda Holla, How Brands Can Easily Analyze the YouTube Stats of Any Video Creator, Vidooly; Twitter: @vidoolydotcom
This goes against what has drawn many audiences to the platform in the first place. YouTube has a history of LGBT acceptance – being the home of the “it gets better” videos, in which celebrities and public figures tell their coming out stories. Many people have also spoken about how YouTube’s videos on transitioning or mental health helped them greatly. So given this, it is hoped that going forward, YouTube also remembers to pay attention to their communities and audiences as well as the big brands and content creators.
Before you start filming video content, you’ll need to set up your YouTube channel. This can get a bit complicated. As you probably know, YouTube is owned by Google. As a result, when you sign up for a Gmail account, you’ll automatically have access to a YouTube account, a Google+ account, and much more. Depending on your business, you may not want to tie your email to your business’s YouTube channel, especially if you need to share access to the account with team members or an agency partner. We suggest that you create a common email account that can be used by multiple people.
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