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Are you creating videos around a few specific themes? Playlists might be the perfect tool for you! Playlists allow you to curate a collection of videos from both your channel and other channels. Not only do playlists help to organize your channel and encourage viewers to continue watching similar content, they also show up separately in search results. Creating playlists provide you with more discoverable content.
During the summer of 2006, YouTube was one of the fastest growing sites on the World Wide Web,[11] hosting more than 65,000 new video uploads. The site delivered an average of 100 million video views per day in July.[12] It was ranked the fifth-most-popular website on Alexa, far out-pacing even MySpace's rate of growth.[13] The website averaged nearly 20 million visitors per month according to Nielsen/NetRatings,[12] with around 44% female and 56% male visitors. The 12- to 17-year-old age group was dominant.[14] YouTube's pre-eminence in the online market was substantial. According to the website Hitwise.com, YouTube commanded up to 64% of the UK online video market.[15]
Volume. Wins. Ask any full-time YouTuber, social celebrity, successful vlogger, or brand on YouTube and they will tell you that their viewership rose as soon as they started increasing their volume. Now, there is a tipping point, and you can’t simply be publishing rubbish content and expect it to perform well. The perfect intersection is quality content but published on an extremely regular basis—but it’s the regularity that often gets glossed over.
So, here’s the thing, you don’t want to start an online business without considering the use of videos. You may haven’t noticed it but everywhere you look, this form of content really draws in a lot of people as compared to the sole use of articles and images. Adding videos to your website is a game-changer and you can search for the numbers if you’re in doubt.
During the summer of 2006, YouTube was one of the fastest growing sites on the World Wide Web,[11] hosting more than 65,000 new video uploads. The site delivered an average of 100 million video views per day in July.[12] It was ranked the fifth-most-popular website on Alexa, far out-pacing even MySpace's rate of growth.[13] The website averaged nearly 20 million visitors per month according to Nielsen/NetRatings,[12] with around 44% female and 56% male visitors. The 12- to 17-year-old age group was dominant.[14] YouTube's pre-eminence in the online market was substantial. According to the website Hitwise.com, YouTube commanded up to 64% of the UK online video market.[15]
When marketing on YouTube, it’s important to recognize and consider your audience’s stage in the buying process. Some marketers try to cold-sell to customers and prospects who might be interested in their products. The problem is that people who find your videos on YouTube are usually in the discovery stage and aren’t ready to commit to a purchase.
YouTube uses a cost per view (CPV) model, which means you only pay when someone engages with your video ad. If your ad is skipped, you aren’t charged for that view. The exact cost per click varies varies on keyword competitiveness but on average it’s around $0.06. Once you set your daily campaign budget, YouTube will display your ad until the daily budget is spent.

The great thing about sponsorships is that you don’t have to give YouTube a cut. Plus, you can negotiate whatever contracts you want based on impressions and the size of your audience. In most cases, the amount of revenue you generate from sponsorships is substantially more than YouTube ad revenue. (Meanwhile, you can still generate ad revenue. So it’s like having two sources of income from the same video.)
Regardless of the exact number, it's safe to assume that YouTube's ad sales are growing at a rapid clip. On its earnings calls, Google has signaled that outside of mobile search, YouTube has been the biggest driver behind its rapid ad sales growth. Last quarter, "paid clicks" on Google's own sites and apps rose 59% annually -- this figure covers not only actual ad clicks, but (among other things) the showing of YouTube video ads that were watched long enough for Google to get paid.
As an advertiser on YouTube, you're populating your YouTube channel with video advertisements made by you. The difference between YouTube ads and, say, TV commercials, is that you get to show YouTube ads to more specific and often more engaged audience segments. You'll pay YouTube to host your ads on other, highly watched YouTube channels that appeal to the same viewership you're targeting.

With the basic profile complete, it’s time to add a few finishing touches! Before we move on, it’s important to get one thing straight -- you can customize the way your YouTube channel looks to subscribers and unsubscribed visitors. This means that unsubscribed viewers would see different featured content than dedicated, subscribed viewers. Pretty cool, right?
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