Ezarik and many other YouTube stars are often paid as a brand “ambassador” or “influencer.” After all, if a popular YouTube personality has direct access to millions of fans — who could watch their videos anywhere, anytime, and on a multitude of devices — a sponsorship or endorsement arrangement could be smart for companies big and small. And it could be extremely lucrative for the YouTuber, too. With TV viewership on the decline, millennials are turning to YouTube in big numbers. YouTubers can be creative on how they integrate products or services into their videos. Ezarik has worked with major brands including Mattel, Microsoft, Ford, GE, Intel, Sharpie, Doritos, Taco Bell, eBay, P&G, Banana Republic, Samsung, AOL, and Carl’s Jr.

Show you love your content: You need to be creating videos about something you love. Having a passion for your videos will make an affect on how they're received - if you seem interested, chances are your viewers will be too. If you don't love what you're doing you'll soon get bored and the videos will start to reflect that. Passion comes first, and the money comes second!
I’m sure you have seen a viral YouTube video. They come in all shapes and sizes—from super popular songs like “Watch Me (Whip/Nae Nae)” to a funny grumpy cat, someone falling down, or even something completely off the wall like Ylvis' “What Does the Fox Say?" video. What do they all have in common? Well, these posters all made a ton of money on YouTube when their videos went viral.
5. Sell products or services to viewers: If you have merchandise or offer a service that’s relevant to your audience, let them know about it and provide links in your videos. For example, comedian Jenna Mourey, more commonly known by her YouTube name Jenna Marbles, sells T-shirts and posters featuring one of her dogs. Selling a physical product might require you to buy materials or find a manufacturer, but you can also sell downloadables such as e-books or art prints. Have a secure payment system in place before you advertise your goods.
In late 2011 and early 2012, YouTube launched over 100 "premium" or "original" channels. It was reported the initiative cost $100 million.[52] Two years later, in November 2013, it was documented that the landing page of the original channels became a 404 error page.[53][54] Despite this, original channels such as SourceFed and Crash Course were able to become successful.[55][56]

18. Find the right influencers. “It is the age of digital celebrities; or as they are called – Influencers. These are the people who get people to not just think about your brand, but also buy from you! Unlike the traditional celebrities, these digital stars still work their regular jobs and do regular stuff that their followers can relate to. They have a dedicated audience unlike movie stars or celebs who have a large but detached fan base. Also, brand endorsements seem like a natural fit in their content because the sole purpose of their online presence is to share their life with their fans. Measurement of the ROI for such influencer campaigns is also easier when compared to a celebrity endorsement.” – Aravinda Holla, How Brands Can Easily Analyze the YouTube Stats of Any Video Creator, Vidooly; Twitter: @vidoolydotcom

There are other views in the debate that agree with Tapscott and Williams that it is increasingly based on harnessing open source/content, networking, sharing, and peering, but they argue that the result is not an economic democracy, but a subtle form and deepening of exploitation, in which labour costs are reduced by Internet-based global outsourcing.
When promoting your YouTube channel or videos on your social media sites, consider the best marketing strategy. Simply sharing the video on your timeline or feed may not be the most effective option. Think of why you made the video. Maybe you created a tutorial because users were asking a lot of questions about how to use your product. In that case, it might be best to respond to those questions with a link to your video. If you created a video as part of a larger campaign or global trend, be sure to include relevant #hashtags where appropriate to ensure your video is included in the conversation.
Case studies: Another way you can promote your business and your products or services is to create video case studies of your clients. These case studies don’t need to deal exclusively with your product: they can focus on client origin stories, recent achievements, or plans for the future. Hootsuite publishes videos of their work with different brands:
You can also sign up for Patreon, which allows you to launch membership-only video channels through YouTube at a small fee per month for regular rewards. Just imagine how much a YouTube channel could generate if it has the 1,000 subscribers required by the YPP. Charge $1 for a new channel with new content, and you could be looking at a solid monthly revenue stream.

YouTube has a library of free sound effects and music to use in your videos. Some other great resources for royalty free music are Pond5, Epidemic Sound, and PremiumBeat. Both services include thousands of professionally recorded and produced songs in a multitude of genres at varying lengths and tempos. PremiumBeat and Pond5 both include a large library of sound effects to add texture and depth to your videos. Sometimes, it only takes a subtle sound effect layer in the background of a scene to elevate the production quality of your video and really pull your audience into the story.
29. Prioritize the visual appeal of your YouTube channel. “Next, work on the visual appeal of your channel. Describe what the channel is all about and add links to relevant content that you may have shared in websites and other platforms. This makes it easier for visitors who want to check your credentials again or learn what your brand is all about. Do not neglect the margins on the left and right side of your channel. Use them to showcase pictures and other content related to your brand.” – Maryanne Gaitho, How to Make YouTube Your Social Media Marketing Tool, SimpliLearn.com; Twitter: @simplilearn
FOR CHRIS PREKSTA, co-launching the now-popular YouTube show "Pittsburgh Dad" was a "happy accident." In 2011, Preksta filmed his co-creator Curt Wootton performing an amusing impression of his father's Pittsburgh-inflected accent, and the pair edited it to look like a family sitcom. They uploaded it to YouTube, primarily to share with their own families. But soon, the video was receiving tens of thousands of views and gaining coverage on local media stations.

On March 31, 2010, YouTube launched a new design with the aim of simplifying the interface and increasing the time users spend on the site. Google product manager Shiva Rajaraman commented: "We really felt like we needed to step back and remove the clutter."[39] In May 2010, it was reported that YouTube was serving more than two billion videos a day, which was "nearly double the prime-time audience of all three major US television networks combined".[40] In May 2011, YouTube reported on the company blog that the site was receiving more than three billion views per day.[41] In January 2012, YouTube stated that the figure had increased to four billion videos streamed per day.[42]
Another big reason why YouTube is such an attractive option for marketing purposes is that it’s all about video – and video marketing is all the rage right now. Video has consistently proven itself as one of the best-performing forms of content in terms of engagement, and just because you’re creating them for YouTube doesn’t mean that you can’t repurpose your videos. These videos would be great for your other social profiles, your email marketing campaigns, your website and landing pages, and any other platforms or channels you might be using.
I've edited 600+ social videos in 11 years for CBS, Absolut Vodka, Reuters, and others. I've been trusted to create effective social media videos for top rated shows, TV specials and clients like: • CSI • Victoria's Secret Fashion Show • Supergirl • The Grammys • Survivor • Absolut Vodka • The Big Bang Theory • The Kennedy Center Honors • NCIS • Blue Bloods • Criminal Minds • Amazing Race • Celebrity Big Brother My videos have appeared prominently on the websites of: • Entertainment Weekly • US Weekly • E! • Hollywood Reporter • CBS • as well as on their respective YouTube, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram pages. "I have had the pleasure of collaborating with Chris on hundreds of CBS projects. He has approached all of his tasks with the utmost dedication and critical discipline. Over the years he has emerged as a critical thinker and creative genius who with his strong sense of style and design brings a stylistic flair to every video content project we have worked together on." - Robert Winsor, Senior VP, CBS Media Group I specialize in editing and optimizing video for social media platforms like: YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and IGTV. I can take your raw footage and tell your story in one to five minutes in a slick, professional, polished piece sure to get eyeballs hooked. I am thorough, easy to work with and always available by phone. Want me for your next project? 1. First - Click the "Hire Now" button to invite me to your job. 2. Fill out "hire" form and propose a project. 3. We will discuss the project via phone or Upwork message. 4. I begin working on your video. If that sounds right for you, just click the green "Hire Now" button and we can start.

The second view is e.g. taken by Christian Fuchs in his book "Internet and Society". He argues that YouTube is an example of a business model that is based on combining the gift with the commodity. The first is free, the second yields profit. The novel aspect of this business strategy is that it combines what seems at first to be different, the gift and the commodity. YouTube would give free access to its users, the more users, the more profit it can potentially make because it can in principle increase advertisement rates and will gain further interest of advertisers.[135] YouTube would sell its audience that it gains by free access to its advertising customers.[135]:181

When promoting your YouTube channel or videos on your social media sites, consider the best marketing strategy. Simply sharing the video on your timeline or feed may not be the most effective option. Think of why you made the video. Maybe you created a tutorial because users were asking a lot of questions about how to use your product. In that case, it might be best to respond to those questions with a link to your video. If you created a video as part of a larger campaign or global trend, be sure to include relevant #hashtags where appropriate to ensure your video is included in the conversation.
Starting in May 2017, YouTube will no longer allow users to add annotations to their videos. Instead, they are encouraging users to incorporate cards and end screens in their videos to poll viewers, link to external sites, or direct people to other videos. Thankfully, cards and end screens are as easy to add as annotations. Cards are small, rectangular notifications that appear in the top, right-hand corner of both desktop and mobile screens. You can include up to five cards per video, but if you’re including multiple cards, be sure to space them out evenly to give viewers time to take the desired action.
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