And though they don't appear to be huge revenue contributors at this point, the YouTube Red and YouTube TV subscription services can't be overlooked when trying to value the company. Particularly YouTube Red, which provides ad-free YouTube, some original shows and access to the Google Play Music service for $10 per month, and which led YouTube to become the top-grossing U.S. iPhone app in March. Later this year, Google plans to replace Google Play Music -- in many ways Red's weak link -- with YouTube Remix, a music service that's fully integrated with YouTube.
“…’So I really do believe that it’s not about the quality of your camera or your equipment. It’s about the value of the content you’re creating and how much you’re actually going to answer people’s questions or solve people’s problems. And that’s true of so many different videos on YouTube. There are videos that have millions of views that were shot on an iPhone.'” – Sunny Lenarduzzi as quoted by Tyler Basu in Top 3 YouTube Video Marketing Tips from Sunny Lenarduzzi, Influencive; Twitter: @Influencive

5. Sell products or services to viewers: If you have merchandise or offer a service that’s relevant to your audience, let them know about it and provide links in your videos. For example, comedian Jenna Mourey, more commonly known by her YouTube name Jenna Marbles, sells T-shirts and posters featuring one of her dogs. Selling a physical product might require you to buy materials or find a manufacturer, but you can also sell downloadables such as e-books or art prints. Have a secure payment system in place before you advertise your goods.
Finally, leverage your YouTube reputation and attract live speaking engagements. If the YouTube channel you produce is focused on a specific niche or audience, do some research about annual conferences or other industry events that have keynote speakers. Then, utilize your YouTube statistics and some of your best clips, to put together a package and pitch to the directors of these events.
For each scene, make sure you film from a few positions so you can edit between the clips. For an interview or video focused on a single individual, this may mean moving the camera from facing the scene head on to filming from a 45-degree angle. You can also try to move the camera closer and further away or zooming in and out for more variety. Cutting between different angles and distances will keep your video visually interesting and engaging for your viewers. 
The great thing about sponsorships is that you don’t have to give YouTube a cut. Plus, you can negotiate whatever contracts you want based on impressions and the size of your audience. In most cases, the amount of revenue you generate from sponsorships is substantially more than YouTube ad revenue. (Meanwhile, you can still generate ad revenue. So it’s like having two sources of income from the same video.)
Alternatively, you can also become an affiliate for brands and make residual passive income through commissions from every sale you generate through your channel. This works especially well if you review products as part of your YouTube channel. Since there's no risk involved on the brand's end (they only pay when they make sales), there's usually a low bar to getting started.
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If your end goal is to actually make money from videos, there’s a far better option than simply relying on your measly allocation of ad revenue. Instead, create a YouTube channel and build an audience. The primary goal is to engage this audience and build a brand name. Then, once you've established a reputation, begin driving traffic to your own landing pages where you can up-sell viewers with premium video content.
Having outside income streams is especially important. After all, a change to how YouTube partners with and compensates creators could drastically shake up a YouTuber's ability to earn money with little warning. This happened in January, when the YouTube Partner Program boosted the eligibility requirements for monetization from 10,000 lifetime views to 4,000 hours of watch time within the previous year and 1,000 subscribers, leaving some content creators scrambling to reclaim their ability to earn money.
Make your videos with a specific type of person in mind.  This is basic advertising 101; identifying your target demographic.  Don’t tell me that your demographics are 21 – 55 year old women.  This is the shotgun approach that’s too general and vague.  Do you talk to a 21 year old girl the same way you’d talk to a 55 year old lady?  Of course not.  Define your audience and create videos that’s catered to them.
For instance, say you are a fitness trainer who provides workout videos. You notice that a prominent traffic source for your channel is people searching for “5-minute workouts”. Using this insight, you could now create an entire playlist of different five-minute workout routines. These videos will be highly searchable, allowing you to meet the existing needs of your audience and grow your viewership.
At the same time you’re creating your storyboard, you’ll also want to decide how long your video you should be. On YouTube, videos under two minutes receive the highest levels of engagement. Your video should be just long enough to deliver the key messages that align with the goal you set in step 1. If you do create a longer video, experiment with how you present content -- the pacing, story arc, and visuals -- to keep viewers interested throughout.
I co-create with my clients to help build their brand awareness and story online with creative media creation via graphic design, youtube optimized videos and unique social media campaigns to grow their online audience. Using the elements of internet crafted video editing, graphic design, web design, growth marketing tools & social media management. We support 'positive change makers', shifting to a healthier more sustainable consumerism mentality and a balanced way of life. I am a YouTube marketing consultant, Video Editor, Graphic Designer and social media growth strategist based in Denver, Colorado. I've worked at two of the top YouTube networks, Maker Studios & DanceOn providing channel management, social media organic growth & brand development in Los Angeles. Currently freelancing offering consultant meetings in accordance to agreed social media, general marketing goals, brand development & custom YouTube strategies. I am ambitious, honest, forward thinking and entrepreneurial. I have done video editing for over 18 years and like to create spotlight stories on new and emerging businesses. I have been in the world of new media for the past several years but come from a background in film production. I majored in web design & Interactive media at the Illinois Institute of Art, and have traveled to 37 countries! Always looking to bring innovative & creative ideas to the forefront.
User entitlement -- A key to the plan of scaling up and eventually figuring out how to make money is free services for users. The minute you charge people, most walk off, particularly when they've been trained to assume that services should be free. YouTube has clearly told people that they should expect free video streaming, even if it has considered an ad-free paid subscription service. Getting consumers to change their behavior after they've become used to not paying is next to impossible.
YouTube, just like marketing, is evolving. What once used to be a platform for amateur videographers is now more than one billion active users strong. Marketers are learning that YouTube is a powerful tool; in fact, the 2017 State of Inbound report shows that 48% of all marketers plan to add YouTube as a content distribution channel in the next 12 months. Video isn’t just a passing trend, either: nearly 87% of marketers use video for content marketing campaigns, and Cisco predicts that 80% of all internet traffic will be streaming videos by 2019. The need for marketers to use video to reach their audiences is more critical now than ever before.

From the looks of things, YouTube's top-line growth hasn't been hurt much by worries among some companies -- for example, Cisco Systems (CSCO) , which just announced it's halting its YouTube ad spend -- about the running of their ads against content they find to be inappropriate. It also doesn't appear to have been hurt badly by YouTube's attempts to appease such advertisers by "demonetizing" videos that its algorithms deem unsuitable for running ads against, or the backlash such actions have sparked among affected content creators.
Finally, leverage your YouTube reputation and attract live speaking engagements. If the YouTube channel you produce is focused on a specific niche or audience, do some research about annual conferences or other industry events that have keynote speakers. Then, utilize your YouTube statistics and some of your best clips, to put together a package and pitch to the directors of these events.

I recommend that your account picture (which you set through your Google account) is some sort of brand logo. If you’re a one-person business, it can be a professional headshot of you. Ideally, it should match your profile pictures on other social media accounts for instant brand recognition. This works both ways; if ones of your followers from another site comes across your YouTube, you want them to recognize you so they’re more likely to watch. And, vice versa, if a viewer Googles you, you want them to be sure that the Facebook profile they’re clicking on is actually you. To change your channel art, just click on it when editing your profile.

I’m sure you have seen a viral YouTube video. They come in all shapes and sizes—from super popular songs like “Watch Me (Whip/Nae Nae)” to a funny grumpy cat, someone falling down, or even something completely off the wall like Ylvis' “What Does the Fox Say?" video. What do they all have in common? Well, these posters all made a ton of money on YouTube when their videos went viral.
In early May, Amazon announced a new service initially designed for "professional video producers." Launch partners include media firm Conde Nast, the "How Stuff Works" website and Samuel Goldwyn Films. Amazon Video Direct could compete for the young creative talent attracted to YouTube. As does YouTube, Amazon offers revenue-sharing and royalties for content that attracts a certain level of traffic. 
The way advertising works with YouTube is probably one of the most complicated things that comes with trying to make money off of YouTube. The real estimate comes out to about $7.50 per 1,000 impressions. The difficult part is actually defining the word ‘impressions.’ The only time you make money on YouTube is when someone interacts with your ad or when it leaves an ‘impression’ on them.

Take your videos from dull to dynamic. Whether it's a sweet-potato-pancake recipe for YouTube, an Insta story highlighting your trip to Eastern Europe, or a FB shoutout showing off your latest yoga move, I've got you covered. As a GF globe-trotting yogi I love helping travel & wellness companies achieve their video goals. Because I believe in what you are doing, truly (I say as I munch on my ghee-cooked kale and drool over pictures of El Salvador, my next travel goal). I offer you... 5+ years experience Adobe Premiere Pro 7+ years experience Adobe Photoshop Basic Adobe After Effects editing for graphics, titles and more! ...because you need your videos to look great. You need them to knock the socks off your clients and wow your mother-in-law. You need them to make you famous (and more importantly, make you money). So click the hire button. You know you wanna. (P.S. I can also design you a kick-butt website in WiX)
YouTube's still-rapid viewing growth -- driven by smartphones and to an extent connected TVs -- has a lot to do with its revenue momentum. At last week's NewFronts online video ad event, YouTube disclosed it now had over 1.8 billion monthly logged-in viewers, up from 1.5 billion as of last June. And back in February 2017, YouTube said it was seeing over a billion hours per day of viewing -- that's about three times what Netflix (NFLX) witnessed on a record-breaking day in January, and 10 times what YouTube saw back in 2012.

Are you creating videos around a few specific themes? Playlists might be the perfect tool for you! Playlists allow you to curate a collection of videos from both your channel and other channels. Not only do playlists help to organize your channel and encourage viewers to continue watching similar content, they also show up separately in search results. Creating playlists provide you with more discoverable content.
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