The money you earn on YouTube is entirely dependant upon how many views your videos receive. If you have a large number of subscribers and all of your videos receive thousands of views, the ad revenue will be high. If your videos have a low number of views, those videos will not generate much in terms of revenue. “Gangnam Style,” for example, was a viral hit that received over two billion views and generated as much as $5.9 million in revenue. However, even popular users generally see views in the thousands rather than the billions, so earnings are considerably lower on average. As of 2013, it is estimated that one video with a million views can earn the creator between $800 and $8,000.

Professional quality music and sound effects can often be the difference between a successful video and one that comes off as an amateur production. Fortunately, cinema quality sounds are now readily available, even if your videos don’t have Hollywood-size budgets. When selecting music for your video, it’s important to first consider the overall mood you’d like to create. Music is one of the most valuable tools for setting the tone of a video and often informs the editing style, camera movement, and on-camera action. If you’re introducing your brand to a new audience, you probably want to select music that is upbeat and energetic. The second key part to picking music is to make sure you have the necessary permissions to use the song. What you’re looking for here are songs marked as “royalty free.” This doesn’t mean the music will be free, but it does mean you only pay a flat rate to use the music and won’t have to pay additional royalties or licensing fees on top of that.
Alternatively, you can partner with an existing merchandising network for creators such as DFTBA (Don’t Forget to Be Awesome). However, you'll be competing with other YouTubers in a marketplace and have less control over adding products, offering discounts, integrating your content, and all the advantages that come with owning your own ecommerce site.
Michael did a great job for us and provided a very thorough SEO audit of our website. We had already done some SEO optimization, and Michael did not try to sell us extra "snake oil" as I have had others do. We had an almost two-hour call to go over his findings, and he was very willing to discuss particular aspects/questions in depth. His pricing was very reasonable. He was the only person who submitted actionable feedback in his original proposal, and he very much impressed me versus other larger digital agencies that have pitched for our business.
How does a video streaming service with one billion active users per month and $4 billion in revenue not turn a profit? Ask YouTube, which couldn't break free from breaking even in 2014, according to a new report. Sources tell the Wall Street Journal that Google's video unit posted $4 billion in revenue last year, up from $3 billion in 2013, and that while the service accounted for 6 percent of Google's overall sales, it contributed nothing to earnings.
21. Focus on stories instead of sales. “Before the rise of social media, if you wanted someone to see an advert, you had to rent space within a popular media channel like TV or print. On social platforms, brands can reach the exact same audience directly. This means that branded content (advertising) competes with entertainment, rather than interrupting it.
Understand this, Certain KeyWords Pay More than Others.  Advertisers will pay more for the keyword, “home mortgage” (CPC $17.63) than “cheap phone cases” (CPC $1.38) because the end return is a lot higher.  If someone ends up closing on a home loan that could make them upwards of $5,000+, whereas the end return on a cheap phone case would only be $15.  Would you rather get paid from a phone case video that gets a million views with a CTR of 0.01% or a home mortgage video that only gets 10,000 views with a CTR of 0.08% ?  Consider the scenarios below with the given keywords and their cost per clicks.
This YouTube Money Calculator provides a glimpse into what a user could make with YouTube by estimating a commonly accepted CPM range based off of the average amount of views you insert down below. We take it one step further to provide users with various settings, allowing them to customize the experience. Please remember that these figures are Youtube Estimated Earnings, as there are many mitigating factors which decide what your overall CPM will be.
I believe that any vision ⚡ can be achieved with the right plan of attack. As the founder of a wellness startup, I'm well versed in what it means to build a company and a brand. In addition to giving a project life, my specialty lies in helping business owners leverage YouTube, in the most efficient and effective way possible. Having developed my own YouTube channel and having filmed and edited over 100+ videos of my own, I’m familiar with the details involved because I’ve done the work myself. I’ve studied YouTube intensely and can decipher what creates a good video, a great channel and a solid audience. Whether you’re a company or an individual simply looking to establish a presence on YouTube, or if your intention is to give it your all and commit to the platform wholeheartedly, I’m more than confident that I can guide you in the right direction. I’m available for YouTube Consultations as well as other related creative services such as: ► YouTube Channel Development ► YouTube Channel Management ► SEO Optimization of Video Content & YouTube Channel Overall ► Video Content Strategy ► Video Production ► Video Filming ► Video Editing ► YouTube Video Thumbnail Design ► YouTube Channel Art Creation ► Script Writing ► Creating a Brand Aesthetic ► Copywriting ► Editing 💡 Are you interested in YouTube but don’t want to be on camera? If you’re looking for a Brand Ambassador, I am happy to consider projects on a case-by-case basis.

Friends, coworkers, and even family can be great resources here for finding the locations you need. Keep in mind that for some locations, like businesses and other private property, you will need permission from the owner to film. To keep things simple, it’s best to find your locations through people you know -- at least for your first few productions.
But sponsorships are where the big bucks are made, and where intermediaries like MediaKix and other agencies come in. This is the major leagues: Most brands aren’t interested in YouTube channels with fewer than 200,000 to 300,000 subscribers or average views of less than 10,000 to 20,000 per video, says Asano. The bar is also high because videos cost more to make, and require tricky negotiations —the sponsor will want to know where their product will be featured, for how long, and so forth. “When we’re connecting top brands with top influencers on YouTube, you’re talking a minimum budget of $50,000 to $100,000, and it just goes up from there,” Asano explains. “Some of the biggest YouTube influencers get paid $100,000 to 200,000 for a single video. And then those videos get millions of views. That’s why there’s a lot of money in the space.”
For each scene, make sure you film from a few positions so you can edit between the clips. For an interview or video focused on a single individual, this may mean moving the camera from facing the scene head on to filming from a 45-degree angle. You can also try to move the camera closer and further away or zooming in and out for more variety. Cutting between different angles and distances will keep your video visually interesting and engaging for your viewers. 
As “iJustine,” Ezarik has broadened her brand outside of YouTube. She often hosts or emcees live events around the world. She’s written a book, I, Justine: An Analog Memoir (2015), and has dabbled in merchandise, mobile apps (yes, more than one), and has starred in TV commercials. Ezarik says YouTube creators could also engage YouTube’s “Super Chats,” announced in May, where fans can pay small amounts to interact with YouTubers during live streams. “Fan funding is fairly new, but these donations are another way you can make money,” says Ezarik.
Flesh out your topics and start creating fresh content on a regular basis. Just tap record on the camera, and talk. Be natural. You’ll also get better at hosting these segments as time goes on. If your videos require other people and/or editing, find some friends who can help pro bono. With videos ranging from five to 35 minutes, Ezarik says she spends more time editing than shooting, but is starting to enlist some help to free up her time.
Advertisers only pay when someone clicks an ad or watches for 30 seconds.  This is why you can’t tie your channel views to dollars.  If your video gets ten million views but nobody watches or click the ads, you don’t make any money.  This is how I’m able to make $1 per 25 views.  Advertisers pay big money to get their ad in front of specific and targeted audience.
There are many options for editing tools and software. Depending on your operating system, your computer may come with free editing software such as iMovie or Windows Movie Maker. These programs provide basic editing tools, like the ability to cut clips together, add titles, and add limited effects and color correction. There are also higher end, more expensive options such as Final Cut Pro X or Adobe Premier CC, which offer an array of editing tools. YouTube even has its own online editing platform you can use to compile your clips and edit together your video. 
Instead, YouTube success takes time and dedication. Kelli Segars, the co-counder of Fitness Blender, a YouTube channel with over 5 million subscribers, spent two years posting new workout videos every week before she and her husband could quit their day jobs in 2010 to focus on the brand full time. Still, without YouTube, Fitness Blender probably wouldn’t exist. “When we first set out to create free online workout videos, we found that most streaming platforms charged so much to host content that we were never going to be able to break into the industry at all, let alone offer free content to our (then nonexistent) audience,” says Segars.
Surf around YouTube and click through the most-viewed video clips to get an idea of the types of videos that garner the most hits. Everything from original music to product reviews, pranks, and even video blogs create interest on YouTube. The goal is to create an audience, so use your webcam or digital video camera to garner interest. Remember that YouTube does not allow pornographic images, nor can you make money from cover songs to which you do not own the rights.

The money you earn on YouTube is entirely dependant upon how many views your videos receive. If you have a large number of subscribers and all of your videos receive thousands of views, the ad revenue will be high. If your videos have a low number of views, those videos will not generate much in terms of revenue. “Gangnam Style,” for example, was a viral hit that received over two billion views and generated as much as $5.9 million in revenue. However, even popular users generally see views in the thousands rather than the billions, so earnings are considerably lower on average. As of 2013, it is estimated that one video with a million views can earn the creator between $800 and $8,000.
Today, there are tons of examples of successful, high-profile YouTube marketing campaigns. From Moz and Rand Fishkin’s informative Whiteboard Fridays to Chipotle’s acclaimed series of emotionally powerful animated shorts, there are plenty of brands currently demonstrating just how much potential there is to create value and awareness by promoting great video content on YouTube.
In 2006, Time Magazine featured a YouTube screen with a large mirror as its annual 'Person of the Year'. It cited user-created media such as that posted on YouTube and featured the site's originators along with several content creators. The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times also reviewed posted content on YouTube in 2006, with particular regard to its effects on corporate communications and recruitment. PC World Magazine named YouTube the ninth of its Top 10 Best Products of 2006.[20] In 2007, both Sports Illustrated and Dime Magazine featured positive reviews of a basketball highlight video titled, The Ultimate Pistol Pete Maravich MIX.[21]
When researching keywords, I recommend doing keyword research both for Google, and specifically for YouTube. This way, you’ll make sure that you’re ranking as best you can on both search engines, increasing views significantly. Any of the top keyword research tools will work for Google (I discuss them in-depth here), and I most recommend keywordtool.io’s YouTube-specific search. Prioritize the keywords you find in the YouTube search, as this will be your best bet for being found.
“Another good idea is to include an opinion in the text and highlight a section of your video that supports that opinion. Follow-up ASAP with any comments you receive. And keep the conversation going by asking open-ended questions, linking to relevant content and thanking users for watching.” – Ashley Gwilliam, The 10 Best SEO Video Marketing Tips (From Top Experts), Lean Labs; Twitter: @lean_labs
What kind of sales multiple does this fast-growing video juggernaut deserve? It's tough to think of a direct comparison. Netflix, which trades for over eight times its 2018 revenue consensus, relies on subscription revenue rather than ads. And whereas YouTube largely relies on ad revenue-sharing deals with content partners, Netflix directly pays its content partners for their material.
In 2006, Time Magazine featured a YouTube screen with a large mirror as its annual 'Person of the Year'. It cited user-created media such as that posted on YouTube and featured the site's originators along with several content creators. The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times also reviewed posted content on YouTube in 2006, with particular regard to its effects on corporate communications and recruitment. PC World Magazine named YouTube the ninth of its Top 10 Best Products of 2006.[20] In 2007, both Sports Illustrated and Dime Magazine featured positive reviews of a basketball highlight video titled, The Ultimate Pistol Pete Maravich MIX.[21]
YouTube ads provided a big percentage of the Segarses’ income during those early days, and worked well with their content. “Our workouts require strategically placed water breaks, which easily lends itself to monetization/ads that aren’t intrusive to the user experience,” says Segars. “People even joke about how relieved they are to see ads and get a quick minute to catch their breath.” Meanwhile, that revenue allowed them to adopt a no-sponsor policy. “It has cut out a lot of monetization opportunities, but our audience is well aware of our stance and appreciates it,” Segars continues. “We think that trust is an important part of building a brand.” As a result, they’ve roped in a loyal audience that’s now willing to pay for a variety of workout programs and meal plans for sale on the Fitness Blender website.
If you want to make lead generation possible with a YouTube contest, you’re in luck. ShortStack recently released a new contest software template just for YouTube contests. This template allows you to capture lead information just like you would on Facebook or Instagram contests utilizing the software. Users can actually get entries by voting, or by sharing with their friends. You also have the options that come with the rest of ShortStack software, like setting age limits. If you’re going the contest route to boost your strategy and engagement, I recommend testing out the ShortStack templates.
All the estimates by research firms and analysts, says Kirjner, are "based more on belief and anecdotes than on truly representative data. What's more -- beyond anecdotes either shared by Google or collected through discussions with ad buyers, creators and multichannel network operators -- we know very little about what is available on YouTube, what people watch and how much it gets watched."
"Whether your business is closer to Boeing or P&G, or more like YouTube or flickr, there are vast pools of external talent that you can tap with the right approach. Companies that adopt these models can drive important changes in their industries and rewrite the rules of competition"[134]:270 "new business models for open content will not come from traditional media establishments, but from companies such as Google, Yahoo, and YouTube. This new generation of companies is not burned by the legacies that inhibit the publishing incumbents, so they can be much more agile in responding to customer demands. More important, they understand that you don't need to control the quantity and destiny of bits if they can provide compelling venues in which people build communities around sharing and remixing content. Free content is just the lure on which they layer revenue from advertising and premium services".[134]:271sq

Michael did a great job for us and provided a very thorough SEO audit of our website. We had already done some SEO optimization, and Michael did not try to sell us extra "snake oil" as I have had others do. We had an almost two-hour call to go over his findings, and he was very willing to discuss particular aspects/questions in depth. His pricing was very reasonable. He was the only person who submitted actionable feedback in his original proposal, and he very much impressed me versus other larger digital agencies that have pitched for our business.
For instance, say you are a fitness trainer who provides workout videos. You notice that a prominent traffic source for your channel is people searching for “5-minute workouts”. Using this insight, you could now create an entire playlist of different five-minute workout routines. These videos will be highly searchable, allowing you to meet the existing needs of your audience and grow your viewership.

YouTube also has a more democratic appeal. Unlike Instagram, where the biggest influencers are mainstream megastars in their own right (Selena Gomez, Ariana Grande, Beyoncé), YouTube is dominated by homegrown celebrities, such as Jenna Mourey (a.k.a. Jenna Marbles), Mariand Castrejón Castañeda (a.k.a. Yuya, a Mexican beauty vlogger), and a bunch of gamers that I’ve never heard of but have millions of fans. The world’s highest-paid YouTube star is Daniel Middleton, a British 26-year-old who goes by “DanTDM” and gained his fortune (an estimated annual income of $16.5 million, per Forbes) by posting videos of himself playing Minecraft. Last year, he did an international tour that included four sold-out nights at the Sydney Opera House.
If you want to make lead generation possible with a YouTube contest, you’re in luck. ShortStack recently released a new contest software template just for YouTube contests. This template allows you to capture lead information just like you would on Facebook or Instagram contests utilizing the software. Users can actually get entries by voting, or by sharing with their friends. You also have the options that come with the rest of ShortStack software, like setting age limits. If you’re going the contest route to boost your strategy and engagement, I recommend testing out the ShortStack templates.

23. Hook non-subscribers with your channel trailer video. “Your channel homepage looks different for subscribers and non-subscribers. Have you adjusted your channel page accordingly? For example, on my channel non-subscribers see the channel trailer video. But subscribers see something different. The trailer is hidden, and instead they see my featured videos.


Volume. Wins. Ask any full-time YouTuber, social celebrity, successful vlogger, or brand on YouTube and they will tell you that their viewership rose as soon as they started increasing their volume. Now, there is a tipping point, and you can’t simply be publishing rubbish content and expect it to perform well. The perfect intersection is quality content but published on an extremely regular basis—but it’s the regularity that often gets glossed over.


29. Prioritize the visual appeal of your YouTube channel. “Next, work on the visual appeal of your channel. Describe what the channel is all about and add links to relevant content that you may have shared in websites and other platforms. This makes it easier for visitors who want to check your credentials again or learn what your brand is all about. Do not neglect the margins on the left and right side of your channel. Use them to showcase pictures and other content related to your brand.” – Maryanne Gaitho, How to Make YouTube Your Social Media Marketing Tool, SimpliLearn.com; Twitter: @simplilearn
Listicles: Listicles are a very popular content format, both as blog posts and as media (videos, images, infographics, etc.). You can create listicles that highlight your products or services – like “The 10 most innovative ways you can use (your product)” – or they can be educational, informational, or entertaining. Just remember, the lists should always be relevant to your audiences’ interests and your business niche.

19. Focus on entertaining instead of advertising. “If you want to advertise on YouTube, it’s best to pay via AdWords and have your advertisement promoted across the platform to relevant demographics. However, when you’re uploading videos via your own YouTube channel, stick to entertainment rather than advertising. Keep in mind how video is important in the buying cycle.
At the end of the day, though, there are a lot of variables that can affect just how much you can make on YouTube. Your audience has a lot to do with the type of ad that would work best. For example, if you are making short funny videos, it’s probably best to not include a 30-second ad at the beginning—a viewer might just skip right on by. Luckily, YouTube has an analytics page that you can use to see just about every measurable aspect of your video—from demographics to time of day watched and location.
34. Treat videos like blog posts. “Don’t waste the opportunities to drive traffic to your YouTube channel through other social media platforms. Think of it as you would a blog post. The more nurturing it gets from all of your social activities, the more traffic it will get. So tweet it, blog about it, post it on Facebook, and promote it through your email newsletters.” – Six Tips for Using YouTube for B2B Marketing, Bluetext; Twitter: @bluetext
“The first step in producing a video that ranks high in your niche is finding the right keywords. You should find keywords that have YouTube video results on the first page of Google so that your video also has a high likelihood of ranking near the top of the page for the relevant search terms.” – Raghav Haran, A YouTube Video Marketing Guide to Increase Prospects in Your Funnel, Single Grain; Twitter: @singlegrain
I'm a digital marketing expert with over 12 years of wide-ranging experience in PPC advertising, SEM, community management, inbound marketing, digital strategy, project management, and PR. My main focus is on PPC advertising. Through the thoughtful use of quality targeted content, industry-specific social research and individually tailored multi-channel campaigns + analytics, I help small-to-medium sized businesses in all industries better engage with customers and increase brand awareness while also driving revenues.  Every business has unique needs and value propositions. These variants require custom strategy solutions. I'm here to help create, implement, maintain, and iterate upon campaigns tailored specifically to your business, cause, or venture. Please reach out to learn more. :: Service Offerings :: -Google Ads (formerly Adwords) -Facebook + Instagram Ads -Twitter Ads -LinkedIn Ads -Reddit Ads :: Certifications :: Certified Google Partner Google AdWords Certified Google Analytics Certified HubSpot Inbound Certified

Some investors and others have renewed calls for more transparency from YouTube in light of accounting rules and recent questions raised by the Securities and Exchange Commission about its disclosures. They say YouTube has become a material part of Alphabet’s business and an important driver of its growth, warranting quarterly disclosure of its revenue, costs and profitability. Some investors are also arguing that the lack of disclosure around YouTube could potentially be undervaluing Alphabet.
With the basic profile complete, it’s time to add a few finishing touches! Before we move on, it’s important to get one thing straight -- you can customize the way your YouTube channel looks to subscribers and unsubscribed visitors. This means that unsubscribed viewers would see different featured content than dedicated, subscribed viewers. Pretty cool, right?
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