6. Meet up with fans in the real world: Meetups and similar events let YouTubers connect with viewers and sell merchandise. They’re usually best suited to those with active and engaged subscribers. Those with smaller audiences might want to skip ticketed events and bank on merchandise sales instead. Or if, for example, your videos teach viewers how to draw, you could set up a free class at a local park and sell your book of drawing techniques afterward.

“The first step in producing a video that ranks high in your niche is finding the right keywords. You should find keywords that have YouTube video results on the first page of Google so that your video also has a high likelihood of ranking near the top of the page for the relevant search terms.” – Raghav Haran, A YouTube Video Marketing Guide to Increase Prospects in Your Funnel, Single Grain; Twitter: @singlegrain
While you’re on the quest to find and attract new customers and leads, don’t forget about the ones you already have. Share your video content and channel with relevant email lists. Encourage your contacts to check out a blog post you’ve embedded a video in to increase both the video and website traffic or direct them to a relevant playlist you’ve curated. Sending an email newsletter with valuable information and content is a great way to keep your contacts engaged.

Some industry commentators have speculated that YouTube's running costs (specifically the network bandwidth required) might be as high as 5 to 6 million dollars per month,[132] thereby fuelling criticisms that the company, like many Internet startups, did not have a viably implemented business model. Advertisements were launched on the site beginning in March 2006. In April, YouTube started using Google AdSense.[133] YouTube subsequently stopped using AdSense but has resumed in local regions.
“With the help of Google Keyword Planner, or other keyword research tools, you can find topically-relevant keywords and phrases based on broader seed keywords, and evaluate the competitiveness of each along the way. For a newer channel, it would be reasonable to start with easier, less-competitive keywords or more specific long-tails, and once you succeed – to try ranking a video for more competitive terms.
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I received a Bachelor's in Business Administration from Worcester State College in 2010. In 2014 I opened an online retail business and currently sell my private label products through Amazon. I designed a website that highlights the features and benefits of the products. The website also has a health and wellness blog for which I regularly create content. Recently, I launched a YouTube channel for which I create and edit my own videos. My strengths include but are not limited to: Optimizing Amazon Titles, Product Descriptions, and Bullet Points Creating Enhanced Brand Content Amazon Back-End Keyword Research Product Research Consulting For Amazon Sellers SEO Social Media Marketing Video Editing I pride myself on my communication skills and my ability to adapt to the ever-changing way business is conducted.
YouTube is the second largest search engine, processing more than 3 billion searches per month. Think about what that means—after direct Google searches, people are turning to YouTube to find solutions to their problems—looking for tutorials and other information in video form to address their pain points. Plus, most key demographics watch it more than cable TV. These facts alone demonstrate the huge possibility your video content will be seen by your target audience. 
Before you start filming, you need to decide what type of video would help you achieve your goal. In a recent article from the Huffington Post, companies seeing the highest rates of success on YouTube ranked different types of videos by their level of importance and effectiveness. Before you start thinking of ideas, filming, and editing your video, consider this list of video types.
The money you earn on YouTube is entirely dependant upon how many views your videos receive. If you have a large number of subscribers and all of your videos receive thousands of views, the ad revenue will be high. If your videos have a low number of views, those videos will not generate much in terms of revenue. “Gangnam Style,” for example, was a viral hit that received over two billion views and generated as much as $5.9 million in revenue. However, even popular users generally see views in the thousands rather than the billions, so earnings are considerably lower on average. As of 2013, it is estimated that one video with a million views can earn the creator between $800 and $8,000.

Now that your YouTube channel is up and running, let’s talk about search. Remember how we mentioned that YouTube is the second largest search engine? While creating engaging content is a must, it’s not the only factor for success. There are several things you can do to optimize your videos to rank highly on both YouTube and in Google search results.
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