The tech conceit of starting with nothing and growing a business into being profitable sounds appealing. Who wouldn't like to minimize initial investment? But the successes have typically required hundreds of millions, if not a billion or more, of investment to ultimately succeed. And there are many ways in which the grand concept can fall short the way theory sometimes does when faced with the reality of application.

I specialize in setting up, managing and optimizing (SEO) YouTube Channels. I currently manage 2 successful YouTube channels which were created from the ground up and have managed many YouTube channels over the past 2 years. I also build Wordpress websites, do full SEO on websites and can provide links to websites I have created as well as links to sites that I have done full SEO on. I am expert in both Video Keyword Research as well as Google Keyword research for websites. I also have experience in email marketing, creating digital graphics, basic video editing and more. Since a person specializing in YouTube channel management and Video SEO seems to be in demand, I've listed my SEO process and other YouTube services I provided below. Optimization/SEO Process for YouTube Videos • Video Keyword Research: Find relevant video keywords that will be used as both tags and in title and description. • Title Create a Title that includes the main keyword or keyword phrase • Description: Keyword phrase will be in the first 2 lines followed by description of contents of video + company info outbound links such as links to website, Facebook, Twitter • Tags: Use Maximum # tags using video keyword research • Cards/End Screen • Custom Thumbnails Video Keyword Tools Used • Keyword.io • Long-Tail Pro • Google Keyword Planner All YouTube Services Provided: • Uploading Videos • Optimizing Video: • Annotations: Link to website, to other playlists, suggested videos • YouTube Cards: Link to your product, website offering • Design Custom Thumbnails • Create Playlists • YouTube Banner Art/Cover • Weekly check of YouTube Analytics: (especially the Audience Retention Report which is the #1 factor that YouTube ranks for) • Basic Video Editing • Channel Work – Adding Branding Watermark (subscribe button), adding default descriptions, channel keywords, associating website

In order for a YouTuber to get paid for an ad, the viewer of their video must have Ad-Block turned off (meaning they will see all the ads on videos) and must watch at least 30 seconds of videos they could otherwise skip. Or, this will work if the viewer sees smaller ads like banner ads, according to YouTuber Mah-Dry-Bread. The money generated from the viewer watching these ads is split between YouTube and your channel.
Apply to join the YouTube Partner Program when you feel confident in the interest and following your videos have garnered. There is no set following numbers needed to become a partner, but YouTube must see that your videos have interest and are growing a following before you're accepted. Sometimes YouTube will contact you directly about becoming a partner, especially if your videos have gone viral quickly. If not, you can apply on the YouTube partner page by entering personal information, describing a marketing plan, and defining your video genre.
6. Meet up with fans in the real world: Meetups and similar events let YouTubers connect with viewers and sell merchandise. They’re usually best suited to those with active and engaged subscribers. Those with smaller audiences might want to skip ticketed events and bank on merchandise sales instead. Or if, for example, your videos teach viewers how to draw, you could set up a free class at a local park and sell your book of drawing techniques afterward.

Next let’s break down the types of advertisements on YouTube. You’re probably familiar with them if you watch any amount of YouTube videos. There’s the bottom text based ad that is displayed at the bottom of your video, and then there is the clip that plays at the beginning of your video. You can select which of these ads your video can have, and it might make a difference depending on your audience or how much revenue your video brings in.

But sponsorships are where the big bucks are made, and where intermediaries like MediaKix and other agencies come in. This is the major leagues: Most brands aren’t interested in YouTube channels with fewer than 200,000 to 300,000 subscribers or average views of less than 10,000 to 20,000 per video, says Asano. The bar is also high because videos cost more to make, and require tricky negotiations —the sponsor will want to know where their product will be featured, for how long, and so forth. “When we’re connecting top brands with top influencers on YouTube, you’re talking a minimum budget of $50,000 to $100,000, and it just goes up from there,” Asano explains. “Some of the biggest YouTube influencers get paid $100,000 to 200,000 for a single video. And then those videos get millions of views. That’s why there’s a lot of money in the space.”

“Even if advertisers are paying a decent amount to promote their products through video ads, only a portion of their expenditures ever make it into content creators’ pockets,” says entrepreneur Michael Johnston. “For example, if advertisers are paying an average of $20 per 1,000 ad impressions, the videos where those ads are being shown may only generate $2 or $3 per 1,000 views.”
The power of YouTube's ad-targeting abilities -- enabled by both its own user data and outside data it can get with Google's help -- have also helped its cause. So have its investments in building quality measurement tools that help companies gauge the impact of a video ad on things like awareness of a product and attitudes towards the brand that's selling it.

While not directly related to YouTube, you can use your YouTube platform to build up a following and reputation, and eventually direct your viewers to other paid platforms, like Yondo. This platform allows you to create your own kind of video store, where you can sell special videos (either on a subscription basis or pay-per-view). And, the best part? You can set your own price. 


How many views does it take to make money on YouTube?  This is a common question asked and it really depends on who you ask.  You may have heard that you’ll make one dollar per thousand views or that it’s $1,000 per Million Views.  Some say it’s $5 per thousand views.  Well, we’re asking the wrong question.  We should be asking, “How much ENGAGEMENT does it take to make money on YouTube?”

YouTube has a library of free sound effects and music to use in your videos. Some other great resources for royalty free music are Pond5, Epidemic Sound, and PremiumBeat. Both services include thousands of professionally recorded and produced songs in a multitude of genres at varying lengths and tempos. PremiumBeat and Pond5 both include a large library of sound effects to add texture and depth to your videos. Sometimes, it only takes a subtle sound effect layer in the background of a scene to elevate the production quality of your video and really pull your audience into the story.
During the summer of 2006, YouTube was one of the fastest growing sites on the World Wide Web,[11] hosting more than 65,000 new video uploads. The site delivered an average of 100 million video views per day in July.[12] It was ranked the fifth-most-popular website on Alexa, far out-pacing even MySpace's rate of growth.[13] The website averaged nearly 20 million visitors per month according to Nielsen/NetRatings,[12] with around 44% female and 56% male visitors. The 12- to 17-year-old age group was dominant.[14] YouTube's pre-eminence in the online market was substantial. According to the website Hitwise.com, YouTube commanded up to 64% of the UK online video market.[15]
After you upload a video, YouTube will allow you to choose a video category under “Advanced settings.” Video categories help to group your video with related content on the platform. YouTube allows you to sort your video into one of the following categories: Film & Animation, Autos & Vehicles, Music, Pets & Animals, Sports, Travel & Events, Gaming, People & Blogs, Comedy, Entertainment, News & Politics, Howto & Style, Educations, Science & Technology, and Nonprofits & Activism.
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