In order for a YouTuber to get paid for an ad, the viewer of their video must have Ad-Block turned off (meaning they will see all the ads on videos) and must watch at least 30 seconds of videos they could otherwise skip. Or, this will work if the viewer sees smaller ads like banner ads, according to YouTuber Mah-Dry-Bread. The money generated from the viewer watching these ads is split between YouTube and your channel.

“I recommend that your account picture (which you set through your Google account) is some sort of brand logo. If you’re a one-person business, it can be a professional headshot of you. Ideally, it should match your profile pictures on other social media accounts for instant brand recognition. This works both ways; if ones of your followers from another site comes across your YouTube, you want them to recognize you so they’re more likely to watch. And, vice versa, if a viewer Googles you, you want them to be sure that the Facebook profile they’re clicking on is actually you. To change your channel art, just click on it when editing your profile.” – Ana Gotter, The Beginner’s Guide to YouTube Marketing, AdEspresso; Twitter: @AdEspresso
The traffic sources report shows how viewers are finding your content online. This provides valuable insight on where to best promote your YouTube content. For example, you can see if viewers are finding your content through YouTube search or Twitter. To view more in-depth traffic reporting, click on the overall traffic source category. This data can help refine your YouTube marketing strategy. Be sure to optimize your metadata based on your findings.

As an advertiser on YouTube, you're populating your YouTube channel with video advertisements made by you. The difference between YouTube ads and, say, TV commercials, is that you get to show YouTube ads to more specific and often more engaged audience segments. You'll pay YouTube to host your ads on other, highly watched YouTube channels that appeal to the same viewership you're targeting.
A good way to manage your account is to use a tool to help automate the process. Agorapulse lets you pre-moderate your comments, check and respond to comments from your dashboard’s social inbox (which you can do as part of a team + you can assign tasks), as well as monitor YouTube for mentions of your brand in videos and comments. Other useful management features include saved replies (to respond to comments with a few clicks) and a social CRM tool to help keep track of your subscribers and connections.
Used by countless popular YouTubers, Patreon is a site that allows viewers to donate monthly to their favorite YouTubers, and in turn, allows the YouTuber to (if so desired) give rewards back to the viewers. And, despite the site taking about 10% of the donations for themselves, most YouTubers make more money through Patreon than their own channel, according to Bustle.
Plus, the money you’ll make as a result of these monetization options isn’t exactly going to be sending you into early retirement. You might make something like $1 per 1,000 views, and you can’t even get paid until you hit the $100 mark. For most businesses, this takes ages. Many find that it’s not worth the risk of losing viewers for pennies of potential profit.

“…’So I really do believe that it’s not about the quality of your camera or your equipment. It’s about the value of the content you’re creating and how much you’re actually going to answer people’s questions or solve people’s problems. And that’s true of so many different videos on YouTube. There are videos that have millions of views that were shot on an iPhone.'” – Sunny Lenarduzzi as quoted by Tyler Basu in Top 3 YouTube Video Marketing Tips from Sunny Lenarduzzi, Influencive; Twitter: @Influencive

If your end goal is to actually make money from videos, there’s a far better option than simply relying on your measly allocation of ad revenue. Instead, create a YouTube channel and build an audience. The primary goal is to engage this audience and build a brand name. Then, once you've established a reputation, begin driving traffic to your own landing pages where you can up-sell viewers with premium video content.
You're much more likely to build up revenue by getting an audience through regular content publishing, whether you're making vlogs, cat videos or just talking about custard creams.You might remember the tale of 17 year old Fred Pye - he hit the news a few years ago when he revealed he'd earned £24,000 a year by making walk-throughs for Grand Theft Auto.

FOR CHRIS PREKSTA, co-launching the now-popular YouTube show "Pittsburgh Dad" was a "happy accident." In 2011, Preksta filmed his co-creator Curt Wootton performing an amusing impression of his father's Pittsburgh-inflected accent, and the pair edited it to look like a family sitcom. They uploaded it to YouTube, primarily to share with their own families. But soon, the video was receiving tens of thousands of views and gaining coverage on local media stations.


YouTube is a massive site, so it’s easy to quickly blow your ad budget, especially if you choose high-volume targeting options. Unless you’re working with a big budget to start with, set your budget low enough to ensure you don’t spend too much on a single keyword target. You can always raise your budget after you’ve had a chance to optimize your campaign and know which keywords offer the best ROI.
But sponsorships are where the big bucks are made, and where intermediaries like MediaKix and other agencies come in. This is the major leagues: Most brands aren’t interested in YouTube channels with fewer than 200,000 to 300,000 subscribers or average views of less than 10,000 to 20,000 per video, says Asano. The bar is also high because videos cost more to make, and require tricky negotiations —the sponsor will want to know where their product will be featured, for how long, and so forth. “When we’re connecting top brands with top influencers on YouTube, you’re talking a minimum budget of $50,000 to $100,000, and it just goes up from there,” Asano explains. “Some of the biggest YouTube influencers get paid $100,000 to 200,000 for a single video. And then those videos get millions of views. That’s why there’s a lot of money in the space.”
I am an experience search professional who comes from a background of leading a paid marketing team at a Google Premier Partner. In addition to leading the paid team, my experience encompasses all mediums within digital marketing. This experience allows me to seize upon opurtunities that other marketers may not identify. My goal is to bring the highest quality digital marketing services at the absolute lowest price. By keeping overhead low, everyone can afford the big agency feeling!

I am an LA based video producer. I shoot, edit video, and capture audio. I also do consulting for brand growth and identity. I seek to further hone my skills, broaden my experience and create amazing content. -I shoot -I edit -I design motion graphics -I sweeten and mix audio Most of all I tell stories. If you need an video editor or producer with a knack for narrative and a big picture approach to brand, I am here for you. I am well versed in capturing in the field under every kind of circumstance. I work with a wide variety of software platforms, tools and equipment. Be it video, audio, still photography or all three at once, I have the skills and background required. I have over 5 years experience with Adobe Premiere, Photoshop, Lightroom, and Audition. My past clients include Super Bowl winning quarterback Trent Dilfer, World Series winning pitcher Adam Wainwright, and Hoverboard. I also also collaborate with non-profits, musicians, and small local businesses. I am passionate about new media platforms, particularly YouTube. I have been an active part of the community for over a decade. I have a keen understanding of brand identity and growing social channels. In my spare time I host a podcast, run a YouTube series, and photograph creatives for Instagram. Hit me up for any video editing, audio mixing or production needs.
The money you earn on YouTube is entirely dependant upon how many views your videos receive. If you have a large number of subscribers and all of your videos receive thousands of views, the ad revenue will be high. If your videos have a low number of views, those videos will not generate much in terms of revenue. “Gangnam Style,” for example, was a viral hit that received over two billion views and generated as much as $5.9 million in revenue. However, even popular users generally see views in the thousands rather than the billions, so earnings are considerably lower on average. As of 2013, it is estimated that one video with a million views can earn the creator between $800 and $8,000.
It's worth noting here that even Twitter (TWTR) , which is seeing minuscule monthly user and ad revenue growth, is valued at more than seven times its 2018 revenue consensus. And Snap (SNAP) , which (though seeing strong revenue growth) is contending with slowing user growth and faces big questions about its long-term profitability, is worth over 11 times its 2018 revenue consensus.
In late 2011 and early 2012, YouTube launched over 100 "premium" or "original" channels. It was reported the initiative cost $100 million.[52] Two years later, in November 2013, it was documented that the landing page of the original channels became a 404 error page.[53][54] Despite this, original channels such as SourceFed and Crash Course were able to become successful.[55][56]
Still, one of the main ways (or easiest) to earn money on YouTube is through YouTube running ads on your videos. Once you get a certain amount of views, you can connect your account to a Google AdSense account, which will allow you to start earning money on your videos, according to USA Today. In order to qualify, you reportedly now need (as of January 2018) 4,000 watch hours in the past 12 months, plus 1,000 subscribers to join the YouTube Partner Program (which will get you ads and therefore cash from your channel). 
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Just ask Justine Ezarik (a.k.a. iJustine), an L.A.-based creator with 3.7 million YouTube subscribers on her channel, and with more than 630 million views on her videos. “Essentially, I’m a content creator who gets to talk about everything that I love – namely, cooking, tech, travel, and video games,” explains Ezarik in a telephone interview with USA TODAY. “YouTube is an extension of myself.”

The Social Media Marketing Talk Show is a weekly 1-hour live video show that features expert commentary on the week’s top news in social media and what it means for marketers. Broadcast on Crowdcast, the show is simulcast each Friday to Facebook Live, Periscope, and YouTube. You can also listen and subscribe to the podcast version on iTunes/Apple Podcast, Android, Google Play, Stitcher, or via RSS.
YouTube ads provided a big percentage of the Segarses’ income during those early days, and worked well with their content. “Our workouts require strategically placed water breaks, which easily lends itself to monetization/ads that aren’t intrusive to the user experience,” says Segars. “People even joke about how relieved they are to see ads and get a quick minute to catch their breath.” Meanwhile, that revenue allowed them to adopt a no-sponsor policy. “It has cut out a lot of monetization opportunities, but our audience is well aware of our stance and appreciates it,” Segars continues. “We think that trust is an important part of building a brand.” As a result, they’ve roped in a loyal audience that’s now willing to pay for a variety of workout programs and meal plans for sale on the Fitness Blender website.
While not directly related to YouTube, you can use your YouTube platform to build up a following and reputation, and eventually direct your viewers to other paid platforms, like Yondo. This platform allows you to create your own kind of video store, where you can sell special videos (either on a subscription basis or pay-per-view). And, the best part? You can set your own price. 
Fancy becoming a YouTuber? You first need to figure out your passion – whether it’s gadgets, celebrity gossip, religion, politics, pets, make-up, and so on. “The most important thing is find out what you want make videos about, and have fun,” says Ezarik. “It’s also ideal if you’re doing something unique, some niche content, you can become the best at.” Create a free YouTube channel. Sign up for AdSense to monetize your videos (see below).
It’s important to visit each location you plan on using before the shoot. On your scouting trips, make sure you’ll be able to capture the kinds of shots you want for your video. Typically, it’s better to have more space so you can adjust the camera position as needed. You should also check for any loud or ambient noise like busy roads or air conditioning units that could interfere with your audio when filming, and you should consider light and time of day. While the room might have sufficient light in the morning, you may need to bring a lighting kit in to film during the afternoon or evening.
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