You’ve determined your goal, created a storyboard, and decided on the ideal video length needed to deliver your message. Now it’s time to find your filming locations. In the film industry, this step is called location scouting, and like every other step in this process, it’s an important part of creating a compelling video. To get started, take a look at your storyboard, and create a list of the different locations each scene requires. Depending on your video concept, you may only need one location or you may need a new location for each scene. 
Friends, coworkers, and even family can be great resources here for finding the locations you need. Keep in mind that for some locations, like businesses and other private property, you will need permission from the owner to film. To keep things simple, it’s best to find your locations through people you know -- at least for your first few productions.
Finally, leverage your YouTube reputation and attract live speaking engagements. If the YouTube channel you produce is focused on a specific niche or audience, do some research about annual conferences or other industry events that have keynote speakers. Then, utilize your YouTube statistics and some of your best clips, to put together a package and pitch to the directors of these events.
In January 2010,[34] YouTube introduced an online film rentals service which is currently available only to users in the US, Canada and the UK.[35][36] The service offers over 6,000 films.[37] In March 2010 YouTube began free streaming of certain content, including 60 cricket matches of the Indian Premier League. According to YouTube, this was the first worldwide free online broadcast of a major sporting event.[38]

38. Brand your content and videos. “If you are the original creator of the content then you should brand it with your name and logo along with a link to your website. Branding is very important because it gives you the credibility. On top of that, if your videos provide value then tons of visitors will share them with others. In this way, if your video is posted or uploaded elsewhere, you will still get the credit and traffic because of your branding.” – Salman Ahsan, Top Five YouTube Marketing Tips that Work, Mastermind Blogger; Twitter: @MMBlogger

Before you start filming video content, you’ll need to set up your YouTube channel. This can get a bit complicated. As you probably know, YouTube is owned by Google. As a result, when you sign up for a Gmail account, you’ll automatically have access to a YouTube account, a Google+ account, and much more. Depending on your business, you may not want to tie your email to your business’s YouTube channel, especially if you need to share access to the account with team members or an agency partner. We suggest that you create a common email account that can be used by multiple people.
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