But from where I’m sitting, these videos are a lot like the TV show Jackass – which was on MTV between 2000 and 2002. The show featured self-injuring stunts including inserting a toy car into one cast member’s anus, snorting wasabi, and tattooing in a moving off-road vehicle. The show was broadcast before 10pm, prior to a campaign led by US Senator Joe Lieberman to remove it.

32. Reset your thinking about YouTube channels and YouTube pages. “It’s important that you reset the way you look at YouTube channels versus YouTube pages as you begin to think about YouTube strategically. You need to think of YouTube as a kind of second website. Your channel is the homepage that anchors your YouTube website. Your videos are the webpages.
It wasn’t long ago that “content marketing” meant producing and promoting blog posts, infographics, white papers and other static media. But as the digital landscape continues to evolve, “content” is increasingly coming to be understood as “video.” YouTube—the original video platform—continues to be a big player when it comes to the most effective channels for video marketing.
5. Consider the customer journey. “If you’re just starting out on YouTube and have yet to build a following, chances are your first viewers will find you through search. So before you hit record or start building your video story, think about how you want your customers or viewers to find you. Who are you trying to attract? What are they searching for on Google or YouTube and how can you help them? Figure out which keywords you want your brand to rank for and craft compelling and entertaining video content around those keywords. The key to is to think about what the ideal path for your customer is. Say your company is a photo printing company. Your brand may be interesting to people who are searching for things such as ‘engagement photos,’ ‘scrapbooks,’ etc. If you want to capture those interested folks, your best bet is to create content for what they’re already searching for.” – Amy Copperman, 4 Essential Tips for YouTube Video Success, Adobe Spark; Twitter: @AdobeSpark

Advertising rates -- Online media in general has had major problems with ad revenue. Even though video ads pay better than banners or other text ads, advertisers only want to be charged for people who actually see the ads. The question of verifying the actual audience that saw an ad is a thorny one. Older media like print and television were hugely profitable in their heydays because they never had to show that the audiences they claimed were ever truly realized by advertisers.


Now that you’ve produced a video and optimized it for search, let’s talk about how to market your YouTube channel and videos. While ranking high in search results and having a large subscriber base are ideal, those goals can be difficult to achieve when you’re just starting out. That’s why it’s important to always spread the word about your YouTube channel and videos across other platforms. Fortunately, YouTube and other platforms make it easy to share video content. Below are some tips for how to best promote your YouTube content on other channels.
It wasn’t long ago that “content marketing” meant producing and promoting blog posts, infographics, white papers and other static media. But as the digital landscape continues to evolve, “content” is increasingly coming to be understood as “video.” YouTube—the original video platform—continues to be a big player when it comes to the most effective channels for video marketing.
YouTube, just like marketing, is evolving. What once used to be a platform for amateur videographers is now more than one billion active users strong. Marketers are learning that YouTube is a powerful tool; in fact, the 2017 State of Inbound report shows that 48% of all marketers plan to add YouTube as a content distribution channel in the next 12 months. Video isn’t just a passing trend, either: nearly 87% of marketers use video for content marketing campaigns, and Cisco predicts that 80% of all internet traffic will be streaming videos by 2019. The need for marketers to use video to reach their audiences is more critical now than ever before.
As “iJustine,” Ezarik has broadened her brand outside of YouTube. She often hosts or emcees live events around the world. She’s written a book, I, Justine: An Analog Memoir (2015), and has dabbled in merchandise, mobile apps (yes, more than one), and has starred in TV commercials. Ezarik says YouTube creators could also engage YouTube’s “Super Chats,” announced in May, where fans can pay small amounts to interact with YouTubers during live streams. “Fan funding is fairly new, but these donations are another way you can make money,” says Ezarik.
Knowing who you are and, perhaps more importantly, who your audience is will make you attractive to advertisers, sponsors and partners outside the YouTube sphere, experts say. Make sure to also set yourself up as someone who is "brand safe," says Tyler Vaught, head of Niche, Twitter's service that connects creators worldwide with brands to develop branded content. That could mean not using profanities, avoiding charged political topics and dodging drug references and other controversial topics on your channel.
In late 2011 and early 2012, YouTube launched over 100 "premium" or "original" channels. It was reported the initiative cost $100 million.[52] Two years later, in November 2013, it was documented that the landing page of the original channels became a 404 error page.[53][54] Despite this, original channels such as SourceFed and Crash Course were able to become successful.[55][56]
User entitlement -- A key to the plan of scaling up and eventually figuring out how to make money is free services for users. The minute you charge people, most walk off, particularly when they've been trained to assume that services should be free. YouTube has clearly told people that they should expect free video streaming, even if it has considered an ad-free paid subscription service. Getting consumers to change their behavior after they've become used to not paying is next to impossible.
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While not directly related to YouTube, you can use your YouTube platform to build up a following and reputation, and eventually direct your viewers to other paid platforms, like Yondo. This platform allows you to create your own kind of video store, where you can sell special videos (either on a subscription basis or pay-per-view). And, the best part? You can set your own price. 
YouTube, just like marketing, is evolving. What once used to be a platform for amateur videographers is now more than one billion active users strong. Marketers are learning that YouTube is a powerful tool; in fact, the 2017 State of Inbound report shows that 48% of all marketers plan to add YouTube as a content distribution channel in the next 12 months. Video isn’t just a passing trend, either: nearly 87% of marketers use video for content marketing campaigns, and Cisco predicts that 80% of all internet traffic will be streaming videos by 2019. The need for marketers to use video to reach their audiences is more critical now than ever before.
Friends, coworkers, and even family can be great resources here for finding the locations you need. Keep in mind that for some locations, like businesses and other private property, you will need permission from the owner to film. To keep things simple, it’s best to find your locations through people you know -- at least for your first few productions.

This goes against what has drawn many audiences to the platform in the first place. YouTube has a history of LGBT acceptance – being the home of the “it gets better” videos, in which celebrities and public figures tell their coming out stories. Many people have also spoken about how YouTube’s videos on transitioning or mental health helped them greatly. So given this, it is hoped that going forward, YouTube also remembers to pay attention to their communities and audiences as well as the big brands and content creators.


Did you know that the top listing in Google’s organic search results gets an average of 34% of the clicks? The second gets around 20%. The third gets 13%… That means all the rest of the results on page one (paid and organic) fight over the remaining 16%. The paid results only get about 5% of the traffic — it’s a horrible affliction referred to as “ad blindness.”
Like any good campaign or content generation, it’s important to establish what you want to accomplish with your video before you get into the nuts and bolts of bringing it to life. Do you want to increase awareness for your brand? Drive inbound website traffic? Add subscribers to your channel? Increase social shares? Or do something else entirely? Establishing a singular goal at the start of the production process is key and will allow you to focus the video’s script and strategy on accomplishing it. It’s perfectly OK to have multiple goals for your YouTube channel, like increasing brand awareness and adding subscribers, but the best practice is to focus on one goal per video. 
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