Apart from vanity metrics such as impressions, views, likes, comments and shares, will a well-executed YouTube marketing campaign have a positive impact on your business’s bottom line? How successful you’ll find YouTube marketing ultimately depends on how you define a campaign’s success. Video content, like any other, should be created with a strong idea of the customer’s journey and your internal sales funnel in mind. It will likely take time to build a following—as with any social channel—but there are ways to get a jump start on your YouTube success, like setting up an AdWords Campaign. Ultimately, if you stay dedicated and keep producing quality content, you'll see results.
YouTube is one of the most popular websites on the planet, receiving billions of views a year and paying out millions to the content creators that it hosts. Money earned through YouTube is generated by advertisements. Content creators who host ads on their videos receive about half of the ad revenue those ads generate, while YouTube takes the rest. Anyone can monetize their videos, as long as their videos do not break copyright law.
Not only do subtitles and closed captions help viewers, they also help optimize your video for search by giving you another opportunity to highlight important keywords. You can add subtitles or closed captions by uploading a supported text transcript or timed subtitles file. You can also provide a full transcript of the video and have YouTube time the subtitles automatically, type the subtitles or translation as you watch the video, or hire a professional to translate or transcribe your video.           

In late 2011 and early 2012, YouTube launched over 100 "premium" or "original" channels. It was reported the initiative cost $100 million.[52] Two years later, in November 2013, it was documented that the landing page of the original channels became a 404 error page.[53][54] Despite this, original channels such as SourceFed and Crash Course were able to become successful.[55][56]
How does a video streaming service with one billion active users per month and $4 billion in revenue not turn a profit? Ask YouTube, which couldn't break free from breaking even in 2014, according to a new report. Sources tell the Wall Street Journal that Google's video unit posted $4 billion in revenue last year, up from $3 billion in 2013, and that while the service accounted for 6 percent of Google's overall sales, it contributed nothing to earnings.
Of course, influencers have their own interests to look out for, too. “The process of creating a brand campaign is holistic, and the cost is not standard,” says Natalie Alzate, the woman behind NataliesOutlet, a YouTube channel with almost 6 million followers. “My manager, agent, and attorney work hard to ensure that each campaign is a success, which is measured by whether the fans respond to it as well they do to non-sponsored content.”
If you really love making video content, consider doing it as a side hustle – something to beef up your resume, find a creative outlet or boost your professional profile in the area about which you broadcast. When it comes to making it big on YouTube, "It's obviously becoming more challenging as there are more creators out there, and everyone is fighting for an audience," Vaught says. "But the barriers to entry are also lower."
14. Collaborate for greater reach and views. “Collaborate in your niche. If you are a fashion brand, then find top channels in allied fields like maybe travel or hospitality and feature them on your channel and see if you can be featured on theirs. This collaboration will give your brand a wider reach and a target audience that matches your audience profile. You can even collaborate with influencers on Youtube or Vloggers and ask them to add videos around your theme/playlist. This works great if you are holding an event or wish to do a series of review/demo of your products.” – Vikrant Chaudhari, 9 Smart Tips to Boost YouTube Marketing for Your Business, SocialChamps; Twitter: @SocialChamp
Some investors and others have renewed calls for more transparency from YouTube in light of accounting rules and recent questions raised by the Securities and Exchange Commission about its disclosures. They say YouTube has become a material part of Alphabet’s business and an important driver of its growth, warranting quarterly disclosure of its revenue, costs and profitability. Some investors are also arguing that the lack of disclosure around YouTube could potentially be undervaluing Alphabet.

This goes against what has drawn many audiences to the platform in the first place. YouTube has a history of LGBT acceptance – being the home of the “it gets better” videos, in which celebrities and public figures tell their coming out stories. Many people have also spoken about how YouTube’s videos on transitioning or mental health helped them greatly. So given this, it is hoped that going forward, YouTube also remembers to pay attention to their communities and audiences as well as the big brands and content creators.
“People will not always just find them – you may need to lead them to the videos. The more people who watch your video through to the end (because you’ve done your homework), the higher your content will rank when people are searching in YouTube, also getting you more views! And, of course, if your viewers like your content, they will probably share to their friends too. More marketing for you!!! And by other people!” – Kathy Colaiacovo, How to Get More Views on Your YouTube Videos, Pepper It Marketing; Twitter: @PepperIt_Mktg
Advertisers only pay when someone clicks an ad or watches for 30 seconds.  This is why you can’t tie your channel views to dollars.  If your video gets ten million views but nobody watches or click the ads, you don’t make any money.  This is how I’m able to make $1 per 25 views.  Advertisers pay big money to get their ad in front of specific and targeted audience.
YouTube, just like marketing, is evolving. What once used to be a platform for amateur videographers is now more than one billion active users strong. Marketers are learning that YouTube is a powerful tool; in fact, the 2017 State of Inbound report shows that 48% of all marketers plan to add YouTube as a content distribution channel in the next 12 months. Video isn’t just a passing trend, either: nearly 87% of marketers use video for content marketing campaigns, and Cisco predicts that 80% of all internet traffic will be streaming videos by 2019. The need for marketers to use video to reach their audiences is more critical now than ever before.

Advertisers only pay when someone clicks an ad or watches for 30 seconds.  This is why you can’t tie your channel views to dollars.  If your video gets ten million views but nobody watches or click the ads, you don’t make any money.  This is how I’m able to make $1 per 25 views.  Advertisers pay big money to get their ad in front of specific and targeted audience.


“With the help of Google Keyword Planner, or other keyword research tools, you can find topically-relevant keywords and phrases based on broader seed keywords, and evaluate the competitiveness of each along the way. For a newer channel, it would be reasonable to start with easier, less-competitive keywords or more specific long-tails, and once you succeed – to try ranking a video for more competitive terms.
Market your YouTube channel and videos on your website and blog. First, add a YouTube follow icon to your website and blog so your audience can easily find your channel. Second, embed relevant videos on your website or in blog posts. Consider creating a YouTube video to accompany a specific blog post or sharing customer video reviews or case studies on your website. Not only will this help market your YouTube channel and videos, it will also drive traffic to your website.
In re: your second point, getting users to pay for content is absolutely part of the equation, but not the entire equation. The whole other half of it is creating ways to minimize the cut a middleman takes such that even if it’s zero sum game, more of the sum is going to the content creators, as well as developing new revenue streams that don’t require a direct cost from users to give direct profit to content creators.

Are you creating videos around a few specific themes? Playlists might be the perfect tool for you! Playlists allow you to curate a collection of videos from both your channel and other channels. Not only do playlists help to organize your channel and encourage viewers to continue watching similar content, they also show up separately in search results. Creating playlists provide you with more discoverable content.
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