Before you start filming video content, you’ll need to set up your YouTube channel. This can get a bit complicated. As you probably know, YouTube is owned by Google. As a result, when you sign up for a Gmail account, you’ll automatically have access to a YouTube account, a Google+ account, and much more. Depending on your business, you may not want to tie your email to your business’s YouTube channel, especially if you need to share access to the account with team members or an agency partner. We suggest that you create a common email account that can be used by multiple people.
In late 2011 and early 2012, YouTube launched over 100 "premium" or "original" channels. It was reported the initiative cost $100 million.[52] Two years later, in November 2013, it was documented that the landing page of the original channels became a 404 error page.[53][54] Despite this, original channels such as SourceFed and Crash Course were able to become successful.[55][56]

There will be two images that you choose. The first will be your account’s picture, which will work similar to Facebook’s profile pictures. The second will be your channel art, which will be displayed at the top of your channel much like Facebook’s cover photo. You need to choose these images wisely, as they’ll be one of the first things that users notice about your brand. In the example below, my account picture is the picture of me, and the flowers are my channel art (please note, this is only an example account).
“Your channel trailer video is prime real estate – and one of the most important ways to hook non-subscribers. It’s important to remember your channel trailer will ONLY be seen by people who are NEW to your channel. In other words, you should speak directly to new visitors.” – Noah Kagan, How to Get 100,000 YouTube Subscribers by 2018, OkDork; Twitter: @noahkagan
Tapscott and Williams argue that it is important for new media companies to find ways to make a profit with the help of peer-produced content. The new Internet economy, (that they term Wikinomics) would be based on the principles of "openness, peering, sharing, and acting globally". Companies could make use of these principles in order to gain profit with the help of Web 2.0 applications: "Companies can design and assemble products with their customers, and in some cases customers can do the majority of the value creation".[134]:289sq Tapscott and Williams argue that the outcome will be an economic democracy.
7. Focus on audience retention. “If people are closing your videos after only viewing 15 seconds, you need to consider how to make the video more interesting to viewers. If people are leaving the video halfway through, this may indicate that you have focused on a specific topic for too long.” – Eleanor Reynolds, YouTube Marketing for B2B Companies: Tips & Examples, The Hallam Blog; Twitter: @HallamInternet
Unlike other social networking platforms, YouTube exclusively hosts video content. If you’re only creating a YouTube channel to upload one video and have no intention of maintaining the platform, you might want to reconsider. You’ll need to set aside plenty of time to plan, film, edit, market, and analyze content on a consistent basis. You’ll need to define your brand’s goals and plan for how video specifically can help you achieve these. However, if you devote an appropriate amount of time and energy into the platform, you’ll be able to create engaging, shareable content for your growing audience.
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